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Thursday, January 12
 

8:00am

Registration
Conference Registration and Information Table

Thursday January 12, 2017 8:00am - 5:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

9:00am

"Become an Apple Teacher"
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Learn about Apple Teacher—a new program to help educators unlock the magic of Apple products in the classroom. Get tips and hear about classroom successes of educators who’ve earned Apple Teacher badges. Learn about starter guides that are designed to train teachers on the fundamentals of using iPad, Mac, and built-in apps. And find out to sign up, earn badges by testing your knowledge, and then receive an official Apple Teacher logo to share your achievement with the world. 

Thursday January 12, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Santa Barbara

9:00am

"Digital Storytelling"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Businesses, politicians, journalists and scientists all tell stories to convey ideas, information or to persuade an audience.  In this session you’ll learn to leverage the power of mobile devices and online tools to elevate student voice and convey powerful stories to an audience beyond the classroom walls, no matter what subject or grade level you teach.  

Speakers
avatar for Michael Hernandez

Michael Hernandez

Educator speaker and author
With nearly two decades of experience, Michael brings practical classroom knowledge to bear when developing innovative teaching and learning strategies, and helping others do the same in their schools. His goal is to empower students and teachers to affect positive change in their... Read More →


Thursday January 12, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Colombard & Moselle

9:00am

"From Direct Instruction to Design Thinking"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

The transition from teacher to student centered instruction can often present a challenge to many educators.  Many have neither experienced this type of learning nor been presented with strategies and tools to support the transition that today’s students require to enhance and develop key 21st century skills.  As the challenges and opportunities facing education grow more complex, design thinking is one framework that we can begin to apply to instructional decision making.  This session will identify strategies, best practices, and templates that can be used alongside a core set of apps for creating active learning environments that foster a culture of creativity and curiosity.  Participants will engage in interactive activities that will allow them to identify how they can design new learning experiences that encourage students to be problem seekers, question askers, and knowledge creators. 

Speakers
avatar for Sabba Quidai

Sabba Quidai

Apple Inc., Education Development Executive



Thursday January 12, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Burgundy & Bordeaux

9:00am

"Project-Based Learning with an Global Focus"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Project-Based Learning with an Global Focus

Audience: Elementary, Middle and High School Teachers; Administrators
Participants will be able to:

  • understand the importance of connecting classrooms to others around the world

  • discover existing projects in which they may participate

  • develop design strategies for planning and executing their own projects

  • identify high caliber project-based learning resources and tools

In this session, participants will focus on project-based learning that has a global component. Existing global projects will be highlighted in which teachers and students can participate as well as frameworks that may inspire teachers to develop their own projects. Tools and resources supporting project-based, experiential learning will also be covered.




Speakers
avatar for Lucy Gray

Lucy Gray

Director of Educational Technology, North Shore Country Day School
Lucy is an experienced consultant and observer of educational innovation, working with a variety of people and institutions on modernizing education. She is a frequent speaker and workshop presenter at conferences, and her projects include professional development coaching, virtual... Read More →



Thursday January 12, 2017 9:00am - 10:30am
Napa & Sonoma

9:00am

Un Conference Alpha
Limited Capacity seats available

Un-Workshop AM (Located on 2nd floor)

Moderators
avatar for Alice Flores

Alice Flores

Director Grants and Initiatives, CalStateTEACH
Implemented/required iPads for all teacher candidates in fall 2010 to develop technology literate teachers. Supported the video mentor project, touch books, animation, engineering and coding as 21st century skills for teacher candidates.

Thursday January 12, 2017 9:00am - 11:55am
Monterey & Mendocino

10:30am

AM Break
Thursday January 12, 2017 10:30am - 11:00am
Continental Ballroom

11:00am

Un Conference Beta
Limited Capacity seats available

Un-Workshop PM (Located on 2nd floor)

Moderators
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →

Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Monterey & Mendocino

11:00am

"Interactive Maker Projects with Chromebooks"
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop you'll attach lights and sensors to a physical model, and then interconnect the model with digital content such as webpages, YouTube videos, and other digital media. Learn how to use curriculum-based student-made projects as the foundation of your classroom or library makerspace.  If your schools are creating makerspaces, this is your opportunity to learn about the best introductory approach that also provides many paths for advanced studies including coding and robotics.

Speakers
avatar for Roger Wagner

Roger Wagner

Founder & Inventor, HyperDuino MakerBit
Former physics, chemistry and math teacher, designer of HyperStudio. Named by Technology & Learning Magazine as one of the top 5 "Most Important Educational Technology Gurus of the Past Two Decades". Recently served on the Board of Directors of a state educational technology organization... Read More →




Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Santa Barbara

11:00am

"Mobilizing Learning with iPads"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

Mobilizing Learning with iPads

Audience: Elementary, Middle and High School Teachers; Administrators
Participants will be able to:

  • learn about the best iOS apps

  • identify techniques for incorporating iOS devices in their classroom that go beyond just the consumption of information

  • consider the implications of mobility in student learning

  • expand their knowledge of resources related to mobile learning

In this session, find out about the latest and greatest educational content for iOS devices,. Apple Distinguished Educator Lucy Gray will lead a session in which participants explore and share content, resources, and techniques for teaching and learning as well as for managing mobile learning. Bring your device of choice or a list of your favorite apps and their curricular uses to share with session participants!



Speakers
avatar for Lucy Gray

Lucy Gray

Director of Educational Technology, North Shore Country Day School
Lucy is an experienced consultant and observer of educational innovation, working with a variety of people and institutions on modernizing education. She is a frequent speaker and workshop presenter at conferences, and her projects include professional development coaching, virtual... Read More →



Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Napa & Sonoma

11:00am

"Passion and Purpose: Social Justice Projects"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

Too often, students are assigned dumpsterprojects--those with little personal connection that end up in the trash after grading.  We know that the best way to foster deep learning is through authentic experiences that build upon students' passions.  Given our social-political climate, students should be self-advocates for the concerns of their community and use digital tools to tell personal stories about race, gender and economic inequities.  This session will share successful social justice practices and discuss ways to empower students to have a positive impact on their community, themselves and society.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Hernandez

Michael Hernandez

Educator speaker and author
With nearly two decades of experience, Michael brings practical classroom knowledge to bear when developing innovative teaching and learning strategies, and helping others do the same in their schools. His goal is to empower students and teachers to affect positive change in their... Read More →


Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Colombard & Moselle

11:00am

"Trifecta! Creating Curriculum at the Intersection of Technology, Pedagogy, and Content"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity filling up

The purpose of this presentation is to help educators develop a sophisticated approach to technology integration in the classroom, which places emphasis on thoughtful and intentional uses of technology that lead to significant learning outcomes for students. Attendees will gain knowledge and skills on how to utilize a core set of applications that will lead to more meaningful learning outcomes. In this presentation, attendees will be shown examples of various lessons with artifacts of learning that demonstrate how technology can help develop and enhance 21st-Century skills such as Verbal and Visual Communication, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Organization, Collaboration, Creativity, and Higher Order Thinking. The final products of learning shared will clearly demonstrate how technology increases engagement, personalizes learning, and make student’s educational experiences more meaningful, memorable, and relevant to their lives.


Note: Core set of apps in both sessions include Keynote, Pages, Numbers, iMovie, iTunes U, iBooks Author  Explain Everything and Nearpod

 


Speakers
avatar for Sabba Quidai

Sabba Quidai

Apple Inc., Education Development Executive



Thursday January 12, 2017 11:00am - 12:30pm
Burgundy & Bordeaux

12:30pm

WorkShop Day Lunch
Limited Capacity seats available

Workshop Day Lunch

Thursday January 12, 2017 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Continental Ballroom

1:30pm

"Become an Apple Teacher"
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Learn about Apple Teacher—a new program to help educators unlock the magic of Apple products in the classroom. Get tips and hear about classroom successes of educators who’ve earned Apple Teacher badges. Learn about starter guides that are designed to train teachers on the fundamentals of using iPad, Mac, and built-in apps. And find out to sign up, earn badges by testing your knowledge, and then receive an official Apple Teacher logo to share your achievement with the world. 

Thursday January 12, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Santa Barbara

1:30pm

"Cinematic Storytelling with iPad"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn how to produce and integrate video stories in your class using iPad in this hands-on session.  We’ll discuss elements of story, video and audio recording tips and provide a demo of iMovie for iOS. Lesson ideas for all levels and subject areas will be provided.  Please bring your iPhone or iPad loaded with the latest version of iMovie.




Speakers
avatar for Michael Hernandez

Michael Hernandez

Educator speaker and author
With nearly two decades of experience, Michael brings practical classroom knowledge to bear when developing innovative teaching and learning strategies, and helping others do the same in their schools. His goal is to empower students and teachers to affect positive change in their... Read More →


Thursday January 12, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Colombard & Moselle

1:30pm

"Social Media for Personalized Professional Development"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

Social Media for Personalized Professional Development

Audience: Elementary, Middle and High School Teachers; Staff Developers, Administrators
Participants will be able to:

  • understand the concept of a personal learning network and the process involved for developing a network

  • understand the concept of the “highly connected teacher”

  • identify a basic set of online tools that will support their digital workflow

  • find suggestions for people and resources to follow that will boost their professional learning

  • consider their own personal journeys in developing PLNs

In this session, education consultant Lucy Gray will tell the story of her own professional empowerment and will highlight digital tools that will allow attendees to customize their own professional development experiences.  Learn how to discover new and exciting resources for the classroom and to develop connections with innovative educators around the world.



Speakers
avatar for Lucy Gray

Lucy Gray

Director of Educational Technology, North Shore Country Day School
Lucy is an experienced consultant and observer of educational innovation, working with a variety of people and institutions on modernizing education. She is a frequent speaker and workshop presenter at conferences, and her projects include professional development coaching, virtual... Read More →



Thursday January 12, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Napa & Sonoma

1:30pm

"Trifecta! Creating Curriculum at the Intersection of Technology, Pedagogy, and Content"- CUE Workshop
Limited Capacity seats available

The purpose of this presentation is to help educators develop a sophisticated approach to technology integration in the classroom, which places emphasis on thoughtful and intentional uses of technology that lead to significant learning outcomes for students. Attendees will gain knowledge and skills on how to utilize a core set of applications that will lead to more meaningful learning outcomes. In this presentation, attendees will be shown examples of various lessons with artifacts of learning that demonstrate how technology can help develop and enhance 21st-Century skills such as Verbal and Visual Communication, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving, Organization, Collaboration, Creativity, and Higher Order Thinking. The final products of learning shared will clearly demonstrate how technology increases engagement, personalizes learning, and make student’s educational experiences more meaningful, memorable, and relevant to their lives.

Note: Core set of apps in both sessions include Keynote, Pages, Numbers, iMovie, iTunes U, iBooks Author  Explain Everything and Nearpod

Speakers
avatar for Sabba Quidai

Sabba Quidai

Apple Inc., Education Development Executive



Thursday January 12, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Burgundy & Bordeaux

1:30pm

Un Conference Charlie
Limited Capacity seats available

Un-Workshop PM (Located on 2nd floor)

Moderators
Thursday January 12, 2017 1:30pm - 3:30pm
Monterey & Mendocino

3:00pm

PM Break
Thursday January 12, 2017 3:00pm - 3:15pm
Continental Ballroom

3:15pm

CalStateTEACH Regional Meetings (By Invitation)
  • Northern California Region will meet in the Burgundy Room
  • Central California Region will meet in the Bordeaux Room
  • Southern California Region will meet in the Colombard Room 

All regions will follow up in the Continental Ballroom for the Statewide Faculty Meeting from 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm and dinner is included.

Thursday January 12, 2017 3:15pm - 6:00pm
Burgundy, Bordeaux & Colombard

3:30pm

Bring it together Panel
Thursday January 12, 2017 3:30pm - 4:15pm
Continental Ballroom

6:00pm

CalStateTEACH Faculty Statewide Meeting & Dinner (By Invitation)
CalStateTEACH system wide faculty meeting

Speakers
avatar for Sharon Russell

Sharon Russell

Systemwide Director, CalStateTEACH, the CSU
Dr. Sharon E. Russell is the Statewide Director of the CalStateTEACH Program. She has directed teacher preparation programs at various institutions. In California, she has been an active participant in the Learning to Teach Continuum, directing a multi- district university intern... Read More →


Thursday January 12, 2017 6:00pm - 9:00pm
Continental Ballroom
 
Friday, January 13
 

7:30am

Breakfast Buffet
Limited Capacity seats available

Friday January 13, 2017 7:30am - 8:30am
Continental Ballroom

8:30am

Conference Welcome & Intro Comments
Speakers
avatar for Marquita Grenot-Scheyer

Marquita Grenot-Scheyer

Assistant Vice Chancellor Teacher Education and Public School Programs, California State University, Office of the Chancellor
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →
avatar for Dianne F. Harrison

Dianne F. Harrison

President, California State University, Northridge
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 8:30am - 9:00am
Continental Ballroom

9:00am

William Rankin Ph.D. Opening Keynote
Limited Capacity seats available

Opening Keynote
William Rankin Ph.D.Bill is an independent consultant and speaker focused on emerging trends in learning and education with broad experience in educational technologies. For the past 3 years, I served as Director of Learning on the education team at Apple, Inc., with responsibility for developing, promoting, and enhancing innovative teaching and learning worldwide in the pre-K to post-20 learning space, working with schools and speaking in more than 30 countries.

Speakers
avatar for William Rankin

William Rankin

Director, Unfold Learning LLC.
Dr William Rankin — a speaker and consultant with broad experience in educational technologies., and director of Unfold Learning LLC.  Unfold Learning is exploring the best innovations in learning and teaching. For the past 3 years, Dr Rankin served as Director of Learning on... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 9:00am - 10:00am
Continental Ballroom

10:15am

"Challenges in Mobile Learning in K-12, Higher Education and Private Enterprise: An International Delphi Study"

School leaders, researchers, teachers, business organizations, data scientists, IT companies, and universities around the world are striving to answer important questions about how or under what conditions educational technology can enhance learning experiences for particular students, tasks, and situations. But no single industry, IT innovation, school sector, country, or institution alone can answer these questions. To fully integrate opportunities offered by emerging technologies, meaningful public-private collaboration among all types of stakeholders is needed.

This study formally documents current individual and shared challenges faced by K-12, higher education and industry when implementing mobile learning (ML) initiatives. To bridge the communication gap between the sectors, this study also highlights where well-established solutions in one sector might apply to other sectors’ needs or challenges. To achieve the study goals, 37 US national and international experts in mobile learning from K-12, academia, and industry participated in a three-round survey, combining Delphi and scenario-based methods, and a cross-sector convening.

First, the results of this study revealed a number of shared pedagogical, policy-related and technological challenges across sectors. The majority of experts from the three sectors acknowledged the need to develop sound and convincing pedagogical arguments based on learning theories to promote the adoption of ML. For policy related challenges, experts from all three sectors struggle with device regulations. For K-12 and higher education, challenges were mostly about the digital divide, equal access, and student use of mobile devices during class. For the industry sector, most challenges centered around a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) delivery method vs. company-liable devices. For technological challenges, K-12 and universities share similar challenges with hardware (e.g., infrastructure and connectivity), whereas the industry sector concentrates its attention on solving software challenges.

Second, this study provides a synthesis of feasible, beneficial, and transferable solutions to some of the most significant challenges in mobile learning across sectors. At the MiTE conference the research team will present the culminating product of this study that articulates possible solutions proposed for 10 scenarios representing the most significant challenges in formats that could be translated or re-scaled for each sector. Third, the cross-sector convening resulted in five different prototypes. The researchers of this study are currently developing an online hub for cultivating cross-sector partnerships that will offer the convening participants and other individuals interested in ML to develop their prototypes further.  

This study contributes to scientific knowledge on ML by providing insight into the cross-pollination of ideas between the educational community and the private sector. Schools, universities and industries must work together in strategic alliances, and importantly, being the process of co-creating curricular which will make the students more workforce ready and K-20 curriculum oriented to industry's future needs.


Moderators
avatar for Juan Espinosa

Juan Espinosa

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Vitaliy Popov

Vitaliy Popov

Postdoctoral Research Scholar, University of San Diego


Friday January 13, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Burgundy

10:15am

"Curriculum Design in a Technology Based Learning Environment Using Social Networking Tools & Platform to Support Pedagogy"

Abstract: Curriculum design in a technology based learning environment that utilizes social networking tools and platform can support pedagogy via application of learning and instructional design theories, frameworks and methodologies that support social learning in a technological environment. This report will suggest curriculum design methodology that adheres to constructivist learning theory, use of a problem-based instructional design model and application of the Community of Inquiry framework for instruction. It is suggested that theoretical frameworks and methodologies that recognize the impact of social interactions and communication on learning outcomes, can also be applied in a technological medium that utilizes social media as a communication tool. The technological medium in this report will apply to the online learning environment, learning management system, utilized in the workforce setting for the delivery of training and instruction.

Keywords: Social networking, Community of Inquiry, Technology Based Learning Environment 


Moderators
RC

Rebecca Chirchick

Faculty, N/A

Speakers
BB

Breshanica Bellard

Ph.D. Program, Learning Technologies, University of North Texas, College of Information


Friday January 13, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Bordeaux

10:15am

"Infrastructuring Mobility in Teacher Education- An Interactive Symposium"

This practitioner research presentation – organised and facilitated as an interactive symposium – will illustrate key developments in the history of mobile educational technology within the School of Education at NUI Galway. Our goal in this session is to share our story of working collaboratively and intensively to deploy - in a participatory and principled fashion - mobile learning within our teacher education programmes and school. We will illustrate this shared narrative by reference to key moments in the process of embedding systematically mobile learning within the School of Education, NUI Galway, and exemplars of our students’ work, specifically their mobile digital artefacts. Furthermore, through engaging dialogically with the MiTE community through an interactive symposium at this year’s conference, we hope to reflect further on the key issues emerging now for mobile learning in teacher education. Consequently, we hope to contribute collaboratively to MiTE 2017’s shared sense of, and insight into the promising but challenging field of infrastructuring and scaling up mobile learning within teacher education colleges and universities.

From a theoretical perspective, our predominant focus as mobile teacher educators is to encourage and promote our students and teachers to use technology creatively and in an integrated fashion, rather than as a passive, informational technology that is, so to speak, bolted-on to our teacher education programme designs. Therefore, we are inspired significantly by constructionism and a focus on learning by design (Barab & Squire, 2004), and technology-enhanced learning models that undergird an integrated view of technology/mobility, e.g. TPACK, Mobile Pedagogical Framework (Mishra & Koehler, 2006; Kearney et al, 2012).
In discussing the role of education in society today, and where mobile learning might fit within this complex and changing context, it is interesting to reflect on words penned, in January of fateful 1916, by the Irish revolutionary and educationist, Patrick Pearse. Just over one hundred years ago, Pearse wrote: “Education has not to do with the manufacture of things, but with fostering the growth of things. And the conditions we should strive to bring about in our education system are not the conditions favourable to the rapid and cheap manufacture of readymades, but the conditions favourable to the growth of living organisms.”  

Through practitioner methodologies such as action research and design-based research, we aim to conceptualise and develop mobile learning beyond the readymade, as Pearse (1916) described it, and create bespoke designs that mediate conditions favourable for learning in a range of contexts. In particular in this symposium, we look at how we have endeavoured – across teacher education programmes, and working with both pre-service and experienced teachers – to design, deploy and evaluate mobile learning for a range of uses and in a range of educational contexts, elective and formal. The settings in which we work with mobile technology include: systematic deployment of mobile learning to enhance Ireland’s flagship Irish-medium teacher education programme; science education and STEM design; specific subject teaching (e.g. English, geography, mathematics); reflective practice among pre-service teachers; the foundational disciplines in teacher education (e.g. history and philosophy of education); and cultural heritage education and museums.

Our interactive symposium will look at, and report on our experiences of mobile technology across four key levels, including: (1) leading learning, (2) implementing technical, (3) mobilising institutional and (4) disseminating/sharing innovation. We will open the symposium with a digital story designed to outline the narrative of the development of mobile educational technology within the School of Education, NUI Galway. In this introductory, scene-setting part, we will adapt and use a model for digital storytelling design which we ourselves deploy with our pre-service teachers. Following this, short presentations will pick up on key themes and topics of our experiences developing mobile educational technology, with west coast-to-west coast Pecha Kucha sessions delivered collaboratively by the presenters, both physically and virtually in California and Galway. The final part of the symposium will involve a panel discussion where conference participants and the presenters will discuss key issues involved in the larger, sustainable and systematic infrastructuring of mobility in teacher education. As a legacy output from the symposium, we will develop an iBook of the presentations, discussions and interactions, which will be shared with the MiTE community as a touchstone, time-capsule artefact, showcasing historical and contemporary developments, as well as future visions, for mobile educational technology within teacher education.

References

Barab, S. & Squire, K. (2004). “Design–Based Research: Putting a Stake in the Ground.” In Kolodner, J., Barab, S., Eisenberg, M. (Eds.) Journal of the Learning Sciences. 13(1), pp.1-14. (Special Issue: Design-based research: clarifying the terms).

Kearney, M., Schucka, S., Burden, K., & Aubusson, P. (2012). Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective. Research in Learning Technology. Retrieved from: http://researchinlearningtechnology.net/index.php/rlt/article/view/14406. Date last accessed: 13th July 2016.

Mishra P., & Koehler, M.J. (2006). “Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge.” Teachers College Record, 108(6), pp. 1017-1054.

Pearse, P. (1916). The Murder Machine. Retrieved from: http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/E900007-001/. Date last accessed: 13th July 2016. 


Moderators
CD

Connie Davidson

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Program director, NUI Galway
I am interested in all of the following! Assessment, reflection, using mobile technology for assessment and peer feedback. Initial teacher education. Language learning, active learning. Using the ipad on the go - for organisation, for taking notes, for sketchnoting, to connect with... Read More →
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →
avatar for Tony Hall

Tony Hall

Lecturer in Educational Technology, School of Education, NUI Galway
Tony is Lecturer in Educational Technology and a design-based researcher in the School of Education, National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway). http://www.nuigalway.ie/our-research/people/education/tonyhall


Friday January 13, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Colombard

10:15am

"The MICOOL App Rubric: Developing a systematic general evaluation tool for content-based educational apps"

The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the MICOOL App Rubric, a systematic evaluation tool intended for the assessment of key criteria for the suitability of content-based educational apps to be deployed in the primary and secondary school classroom. The rubric was designed as part of an Erasmus+ Project  - ‘Mobile Intercultural Cooperative  Learning with Tablets (www.micool.net) involving seven European partners who have come together to share expertise and key learning experiences on the deployment of tablet technologies in schools. An important project goal is to enhance digital integration in teaching and learning including increasing the media competence of teachers through the innovative use of mobile technologies in classrooms.

The MICOOL APP Rubric was produced as part of the research output of the project undertaken by Dublin City University, Ireland. The decision to design a rubric of this nature was prompted by the lack of suitable guidelines for teachers when choosing apps for use in classrooms to support teaching and learning. The proliferation of educational apps in the Apple App store and to a lesser extent in the Google Playstore and stores of other providers, while at one level welcome, is also problematic as very few apps have been rigorously tested to assess their suitability for use in formal education settings.

This presentation will discuss the limitations of existing approaches to classroom app evaluation by teachers and educators and propose as an alternative,  a framework of thematic areas of assessment, on which the rubric is based. The design rationale for the MICOOL open-source rubric tool will be outlined and an argument presented about how this approach provides for efficient, useful and comparable metrics on relevant qualities of educational apps, resulting in reproducible structured data that summarises key assessment criteria for classroom deployment. 

The presentation will demonstrate the MICOOL App Rubric which is structured around 5 sections; the first of which outlines essential and recommended descriptive information to collect, the latter four of which comprise thematic sets of evaluative statements, with 5-point scale agreement assessed using specific responses. The thematic sections are:

  • Instruction, i.e. the quality of instructional content provided within the app;
  • Design, the quality and effectiveness of the app’s design and presentation;
  • Assessment, the effectiveness and suitability of included assessment methods, if any;
  • Technical, the robustness and reliability of the app and the availability of support for it.

Each section contains a number of subsection statements scored by the app reviewer.  Scoring for statement agreement is from 0 to 4. Thematic evaluative sections are enumerated 1 to 4, with section 0 for recommended descriptive data collection. Statements and responses in each section are sub-numbered in an expected hierarchy. Thus, a specific level of agreement with a particular thematic question may be directly referred to in reports based on the rubric.

 Using this system an app’s score derived from the MICOOL App Rubric is presented as an overall percentage, calculated as the mean of the four thematic sections, which are also given as percentages. Thus, for example a score of 85:(96,80,72,92) gives a teacher an overall sense of the quality of an app (85%) and a more specific indication that this score is most strongly based on instructional content and technical robustness, with in-app assessment a weaker area. In designing the rubric allowance was also made for the fact some apps may contain no assessment elements at all but nonetheless are still relevant as educational aids, and as such can be usefully deployed in classrooms. Examples include reference apps, historical event apps and art appreciation apps, among others. In such cases the assessment score is marked as not applicable (NA), and the overall score is calculated as the mean of the other sections. Thus when reported it is clear to the teacher that the app contains no assessment, but the evaluation metrics of the rubric still provide an overall sense of the utility of the app, and of its content, design, and robustness - e.g. 75: (80, 70, NA, 75).

 The applicability of the Rubric will be demonstrated using a small sample of educational apps illustrating the utility of the tool across a diverse range of subject areas. In addition to demonstrating the rubric’s technical features the presentation will make an argument for the development of more robust methods for the assessment and evaluation of technological and digital resources in the classroom and relevant metrics for teachers and scholars. The development of the MICOOL App Rubric is an initial attempt to respond to the absence in the literature or academic practice of a coherent and effective set of evaluative criteria for apps with its designers proposing that this rubric offers a flexible and accessible tool that can be valuably used in a range of educational settings.


Moderators
avatar for Karen Brohmer

Karen Brohmer

CalStateTEACH Faculty, CalStateTEACH
Through the CSU system and CalStateTEACH program, individuals are able to complete university coursework online and student teaching in a local school in order to obtain a CA Multiple Subject credential.

Speakers
MJ

Miriam Judge

Lecturer, Dublin City university
The Erasmus plus Micool project on the use on tablet technologies in Europe and schools. Website is www.micool.org


Friday January 13, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Moselle

10:15am

Interactive Maker Projects with Chromebooks
Limited Capacity seats available

In this workshop you'll attach lights and sensors to a physical model, and then interconnect the model with digital content such as webpages, YouTube videos, and other digital media. Learn how to use curriculum-based student-made projects as the foundation of your classroom or library makerspace.  If your schools are creating makerspaces, this is your opportunity to learn about the best introductory approach that also provides many paths for advanced studies including coding and robotics.

Speakers
avatar for Roger Wagner

Roger Wagner

Founder & Inventor, HyperDuino MakerBit
Former physics, chemistry and math teacher, designer of HyperStudio. Named by Technology & Learning Magazine as one of the top 5 "Most Important Educational Technology Gurus of the Past Two Decades". Recently served on the Board of Directors of a state educational technology organization... Read More →




Friday January 13, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Monterey & Mendocino

10:40am

"Collaborative Teaching Practices in Teacher Education"

The classroom environment is critical to the formation of teacher perceptions about teaching and learning. New teachers observe the behaviors of mentors and other teachers and rely on their own experiences to form perceptions about teaching and learning.  In the California State University System, CalStateTEACH is striving to develop new instructional models for teacher education through collaborative practices that support 21st century learning and teacher development.

In a collaborative practice model, two or more teacher candidates share the responsibility for planning instruction and teaching a classroom of students. This model, similar to a co-teaching model, creates an environment for teacher candidates to engage in a supported teaching practice in a classroom while collaborating with peers to address real world 21st century skills (communication, collaboration, critical thinking, problem solving, and creativity) all within the elementary classroom.  CalstateTEACH uses a summer lab school model of collaborative practice that engages multiple teacher candidates in a single classroom supported by a mentor teacher and faculty advisors for four to six weeks. 

 Teacher candidates who engage in a collaborative practice are able to learn from each other in a classroom setting through situated and socially mediated learning (Lave & Wenger, 1990; Bandura, 1977; Brown, et al., 1989; Collins, et al., 1989) which is well established in research and theory. This collaborative environment creates the conditions for team building and helps teacher candidates refine their teaching skills while they build pro-social, interpersonal and inter-professional skills.  Collaborative classrooms provide teacher candidates with contextual knowledge and experiences to form attitudes about the conditions related to teaching, using social cognition to interpret communication and language, and interpersonal behaviors to construct knowledge of social appropriateness, form interpersonal relationships, discriminate stereotypical behavior and to develop their own self concept.

Enriching the classroom experience for the teacher candidates through peer co-teaching and collaboration provides opportunities for developing pro-social interpersonal skills focused on problems of practice (Wenger 1998, 2006).  Teacher candidates are immersed in an environment where learning and problem solving involves interactions between teachers, teacher candidates, university faculty and students. 

CalStateTEACH has created a multi-touch book on this model and embarked on a two-year pilot study of collaborative teaching practices that seeks to inform how teacher preparation can promote higher levels of teacher efficacy in novice teachers.
References 

Bandura, A.L. (1977) Social Learning Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. 

Bandura, A. (1997). Self-efficacy: The exercise of control. New York: Freeman.

Brown, J. S., Collins, A., & Duguid, P. (1989). Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning. Educational Researcher, 18(1), 32-42.

Collins, A., Brown, J. S., & Newman, S. E. (1989). Cognitive apprenticeship: teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics. In L. B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, learning, and instruction: essays in honor of Robert Glaser (pp. 453-494). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

 Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1990). Chapter 1 in Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. Online: https://portal.utoronto.ca/bbcswebdav/users/brettcla/Course%20readings/LaveLPP.pdf

Wenger, E., (1998). Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning and Identity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Wenger, E., (2006). Communities of Practice: A brief Introduction. Available at: http://ewenger.com/theory/


Moderators
avatar for Linda Coyne

Linda Coyne

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
JF

Jane Foltz

Faculty, CalStateTEACH
avatar for Donald Matthews

Donald Matthews

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Friday January 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Burgundy

10:40am

"How we MiTE design: Towards a design-based research framework for authentic, collaborative and personalised mobile learning in teacher education"

Mobile learning in teacher education is a frontier but developing field of educational technology research (Baran, 2014). As demonstrated at MiTE 2015 and 2016, there is increasing practice and research internationally in the development and deployment of mobile apps, infrastructures and technologies in teacher education colleges, schools and universities. Importantly, there has furthermore been very significant research to help mobile educators, designers and technologists conceptualise, identify and understand the multi-dimensional factors that impact upon the sustainability and success of mobile learning within teacher education contexts and settings. Specifically, Kearney et al. (2012) have developed a framework which illustrates how three distinctive characteristics: authenticity, collaboration and personalisation (and a further six sub scales) undergird successful deployments of mobile learning in education.

Our goal in this research presentation is to outline our early thinking regarding the how of designing mobile learning for teacher education. Specifically, using Kearney et al.’s (2012) ternary framework as a conceptual lens, we will look at a number of innovations in MiTE contexts, and particularly the extent to which they afford and support authenticity, collaboration and personalisation. We will discuss specific examples of the principled design of mobile learning to enhance teacher education, including in professional engagement and development, subject methodology/teaching innovation, and reflective practice. We will furthermore begin to consider how these three important concepts of authenticity, collaboration and personalisation can be integrated with design-based research guidelines and principles to support principled MiTE design.

Design-based research predominates as a contemporary approach to the scaffolded, systematic development of educational innovations and technologies (Sandoval, 2014). However, Cole and Packer (2016) noted how “design research must grapple with the doubly artificial, as the classrooms in which many educational designs are implemented are themselves already artificial and contingent—the products of design—and the learning that is the focus of investigation is already an adaptation to the classroom environment and so artificial.” (p.1) Mobility and mobilisation – through apps, infrastructures and portable technologies - afford us opportunities to challenge this double artificiality, and potentially create whole new approaches, tools and spaces for teacher education.

We hope our interactive presentation and resultant discussion at MiTE 2017 will inform the development of our research to conceptualise a design-based research framework for authentic, collaborative and personalised mobile learning in teacher education. As well as informing our future work, we ultimately hope the development of this framework, and the criteria, guidelines and insights enumerated within it, will be widely useful for those designing and developing mobile learning in diverse teacher education contexts.

References

Baran, E. (2014). ‘A Review of Research on Mobile Learning in Teacher Education’. Educational Technology & Society, 17:4, 17–32.

Kearney, M., Schuck, S., Burden, K., & Aubusson, P. (2012). ‘Viewing mobile learning from a pedagogical perspective’. Research in Learning Technology, 20:14406. DOI: 10.3402/rlt.v20i0.14406.

Sandoval W. (2014). ‘Conjecture Mapping: An Approach to Systematic Educational Design Research’. Journal of the Learning Sciences, 23:1, 18-36. DOI: 10.1080/10508406.2013.778204.

Cole, M., & Packer, M. (2016): ‘Design-Based Intervention Research as the Science of the Doubly Artificial’. Journal of the Learning Sciences. DOI: 10.1080/10508406.2016

Moderators
avatar for Claudia Sholl

Claudia Sholl

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Burden

Kevin Burden

Professor of Educational Technology, University of Hull
I am currently leading several international projects exploring the use of mobile technologies in teaching and learning, with particular emphasis on teacher education. These include the Mobilising and Transforming Teacher Education Pedagogies project (www.mttep.eu).
avatar for Tony Hall

Tony Hall

Lecturer in Educational Technology, School of Education, NUI Galway
Tony is Lecturer in Educational Technology and a design-based researcher in the School of Education, National University of Ireland, Galway (NUI Galway). http://www.nuigalway.ie/our-research/people/education/tonyhall



Friday January 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Bordeaux

10:40am

"Pre-service teachers engage in multimodal assessments to design learning opportunities for identifying and engaging in 21st C skills"

Purpose: Multimodal composing (MMC) (Yancy, 2009) in teacher education assignments was investigated for information on fostering pre-service teachers’ (PSTs) use of MMC in their lesson planning and curricular design. The study addressed the problem of continued privileging of print text in secondary English Language Arts for reading and writing. MMC has potential to engage writers in the writing process, with the intention of then bridging to academic writing (Miller et al., 2013); however, Selfe (2007) notes that MMC, when used as a heuristic, frames it as “less than” print essays. MMC brings writing into the 21st Century, and promotes expression and use of writing for their own purpose as a schooled task (Beach et. al, 2016) grounded in writing expectations that do more to sort students, using academic-writing tasks as gatekeepers. Purposeful engagement of PSTs with MMC assignments in teacher education curricula revealed challenges and potential for transfer to PSTs’ own classroom practice.

         Method: The integration of New Media Literacies (NMLs) in courses designed for secondary-teacher candidates models approaches to increase engagement in secondary-classrooms (Jenkins et al., 2006) and involving students as participants in academic learning. Knowing that, I asked: How can PSTs be supported and encouraged to integrate MMC in their classrooms in critical and meaningful ways? Drawing from narrative inquiry and qualitative methods, PSTs’ use of MMC in required assignments was investigated, with data collection of the assignments, class discussions, and semi-structured interviews. Participants included 36 PSTs enrolled in a teacher-education program whose mission was to prepare them for urban, high-needs schools.

         Findings and Implications: Results showed that the 21st C skills of critical-thinking, problem-solving, collaboration, innovation, and adaptability were developed as PSTs engaged in MMC. Initially, the first MMC posed the challenge of expectations and assessment, leading to collaborative problem-solving.

         Participants saw how critical thinking was connected to MMC production when their first assignments were critiqued for lack of depth and complexity (an emergent problem of unclear expectations). The class worked collaboratively to develop assessment criteria. The literature on assessment is nascent and not centered on common approaches, allowing for innovation in developing assessment criteria of process, depth and complexity in meeting assignment’s purpose, application/media appropriate, and demonstrated understanding. It was agreed that each criterion would be flexible enough to address varied purposes and products. Problematizing measurements for the criteria required critical thinking.

         Additionally, PSTs shared that they felt adapting to what was, for most of them, a new mode of expression, produced innovation in addressing the goals of the assessments. In their planning, they all included MMC to varied extents: some as an add-on, some with unclear learning outcomes, and a few with robust integration to support students in complex meaning-making.

            Implications for teacher education are to foreground MMC, and provide student-centered discussions of expectations, assessment criteria, and purpose. This process proved to support PSTs’ use of 21st Century skills, serving as a model for desired student-centered, authentic classroom practices. 

References

Beach, R., & Thein, A. H., & Webb, A. (2012). Teaching to Exceed The English       Language Arts Common Core State Standards. New York, NY: Rutledge.

Jenkins, H., et al. (2006). Confronting the challenges of participatory culture: Media

education for the 21st century. MacArthur Foundation. Retrieved 1 Mar 2007 from: http://www.digitallearning.macfound.org/atf/cf/%7B7E45C7E0-A3E0-4B89-AC9C-E807E1B0AE4E%7D/JENKINS_WHITE_PAPER.PDF

Miller, S. A., Knips, M. A., & Goss, S. (2013). Changing the game of literature with authentic assessment: The promise of multimodal composing. English Journal, 103(1), 88-94.

Selfe, C. L. (2007). Multimodal composition: Resources for teachers. Cresskill, NY: Hampton Press. Retrieved from http://sciencepolicy.colorado.edu/students/envs3100/selfe2007.pdf

Yancy, K. B. (2009). Writing in the 21st century. A Report from the National Council of

Teachers of English. Downloaded from www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Press/Yancey_final.pdf


Moderators
avatar for Karen Ward

Karen Ward

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Paula M. Carbone

Paula M. Carbone

Associate Professor of Clinical Education, University of Southern California
My lifelong commitment to social justice in education focuses my current work as a teacher-educator at USC. Technology's potential to flatten hierarchies through engagement of students in participatory cultures, innovation and creativity is, unfortunately, only realized by some... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Colombard

10:40am

Targus Focus Session 1

Since creating the first laptop case more than 30 years ago, Targus has been a leader in the mobile computing accessories category, creating a market around enabling mobile business professionals and earning the trust of many of the world’s largest corporations.

Our understanding of evolving business needs and emerging technologies combined with our quality standards continues to advance the category with innovative, productivity-boosting solutions that enable an ever-changing workforce to perform at their best – anytime, anywhere.

Please visit us in the MiTE exhibit area to see the comprehensive “protect and connect” product portfolio from Targus including backpacks, briefcases, rollers, tablet cases, universal docks, locks, power devices, privacy screens and many other mobile computing accessories.

 http://www.targus.com/us/ 


Speakers
avatar for David Dorantes

David Dorantes

Director of Product Marketing, Targus



Friday January 13, 2017 10:40am - 11:15am
Moselle

11:00am

AM Break
Break

Friday January 13, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Continental Ballroom

11:15am

"Please do NOT silence your cell phones: A study on online, mobile learning and TPaCK"

A four-point-effectiveness checklist for continued student engagement with mobile technology in online courses is described in this paper. Designed for pre-service and in-service adult learners, the checklist reflects research in pedagogical practice of mobile learning, knowledge transfer, adult learning theory, and the TPaCK instructional framework.  Data sources include the feedback artifacts of current online course facilitators who also contributed to this paper. Post-course assessment data from adult learners validates the success of best practices for student engagement with mobile technology when the syllabus can be held in the palm of your hand. 

Keywords: Online Education, Online Learning, Transfer of Knowledge, TPaCK, Adult Learning Theory, Personalized Feedback

 References:

Anderson, T. (2008). The theory and practice of online learning. (pp. 45-74). Edmonton, AB: AU Press, Athabasca University.

  Blitz, C. L. (2013). Can Online Learning Communities Achieve the Goals of Traditional Professional Learning Communities? What the Literature Says. REL 2013-003. Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic. Retrieved from http://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED54421

Collison, G., Elbaum, B., Haavind, S., & Tinker, R. (2000). Facilitating online learning: effective strategies for moderators. Madison, Wisconsin: Attwood Publishing.

Gusley, T.R. & Yoon, K.S, (2009). What works in professional development.  Retrieved from: http://www.k12.wa.us/Compensation/pubdocs/Guskey2009whatworks.pdf  

Herrera, SD. (2010). Biography-driven culturally responsive teaching. New York: Teachers College Press. Loucks-Horsley, S, Stiles, K.E.,

Huber, G. P. (1991). Organizational learning: The contributing processes and the literatures. Organization science, 2(1), 88-115.

Iverson, K. (2011). Andragogy vs. pedagogy: much ado about nothing? In V. L. Cyboran, Ed.D., Chapter 2: Six Myths about Teaching Adults, a forthcoming book. Retrieved from RU Training.org database.

  Kent, C., Laslo, E., & Rafaeli, S. (2016). Interactivity in online discussions and learning outcomes. Computers & Education, 97, 116-128. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2016.03.002
Knowles, M. S., Holton III, E. F., & Swanson, R. A. (2014). The adult learner: The definitive classic in adult education and human resource development. Routledge.

  Koehler, M., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK)? Contemporary issues in technology and teacher education, 9(1), 60-70.

  Koh, J. H. L., Chai, C. S., & Tsai, C. (2014). Demographic factors, TPACK constructs, and teachers’ perceptions of constructivist-oriented TPACK. Journal Of Educational Technology & Society, 17(1), 185-196.

  Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Loucks-Horsley, S, Stiles, K.E., Mundry, S. Love, N.,& Hewson, P.W. (2010). Designing professional development for teachers of science and mathematics. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin.

Mathiasen, H. (2008). Is There a Nexus between Learning and Teaching?. In Understanding Learning-Centered Higher Education. Copenhagen Business School Press.

Merriam, S. (2004). The changing landscape of adult learning theory. In J. Comings, B. Garner, & C. Smith (Eds.), Review of adult learning and literacy: Connecting research, policy, and practice (pp. 199-220). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Retrieved from:

https://www.lindenwood.edu/education/andragogy/andragogy/2011/Merriam_2004.pdf

  Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. The Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017-1054.

National Center for Education Statistics, nces.ed.gov. Retrieved from: https://nces.ed.gov/pubs/web/97578e.asp.  

  Perkins, D.N. & Salomon. (1998). Teaching for transfer. Retrieved from        

http://www.ascd.org/ASCD/pdf/journals/ed_lead/el_198809_perkins.pdf

  Selwyn, Neil (2011).  Social Media in higher education. London, Routledge.

Retrieved from: http://sites.jmu.edu/flippEDout/files/2013/04/sample-essay-selwyn.pdf

Stronge, J.H. (2002). Qualities of effective teachers.  Alexandria, Virginia: ASCD.

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning as a social system. Systems thinker, 9(5), 2-3.

Wiggins, G. (2010). Exploring essential questions of education:  What is transfer? Retrieved from: http://www.authenticeducation.org/ae_bigideas/article.lasso?artid=60 

Yoon, K. S., Duncan, T., Lee, S. W.-Y., Scarloss, B., & Shapley, K. (2007). Reviewing the evidence on how teacher professional development affects student achievement (Issues & Answers Report, REL 2007–No. 033). Washington, DC. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/southwest/pdf/REL_2007033.pdf


Moderators
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Helen Teague

Helen Teague

Student / Online Course Facilitator, Pepperdine University & PBS TeacherLine
Helen Teague is a 4th generation native Californian. She just finished defending her dissertation in Learning and Technology from Pepperdine University. Helen also holds Master of Education (Curriculum & Instruction, Gifted Education, and School Administration) and a Bachelor of Business... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Burgundy

11:15am

"The VEO App: Making Continuing Professional Development (CPD) accessible by using of a mobile application for Video Enhanced Observation"
To what extent can a mobile technology support teachers and trainee teachers in their professional practices? How can their Continuing Professional Development (CPD) made accessible and be facilitated? Using a mobile application, VEO (Video Enhanced Observation), this research presentation will firstly introduce the VEO App as an instrument to support CPD and secondly integrate its different possibilities of use in an on-going doctoral study regarding the use of mobile technologies to facilitate CPD of pre-service English teachers. Ethnographically, qualitative data shall be collected using different instruments (videos, interviews, professional dialogues, electronic diaries), to understand how English teachers perceive themselves and investigate the benefits of the VEO App for CPD. As a tool for teachers or teacher trainees, it this application aims them to become agents of their own CPD, facilitate professional communication and reflective practices.

References

Creswell, John W. (2003). Research Design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods

Approaches. Second Edition. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. Dewey, J. (1933). How We Think. New York: Heath & Co.

Hattie, John (2009). Visible Learning. A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. London & New York: Routledge.

Seedhouse, Paul (2009). The Interactional Architecture of the Language Classroom. In: Journal of Teaching & Learning Language & Literature, Vol. 1, No. 1, p. 1-13. 


Speakers
avatar for Mareike Oesterle

Mareike Oesterle

PhD student, research assistant, University of Education Karlsruhe


Friday January 13, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Bordeaux

11:15am

"The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction; The Work of Education in the Age of Digital Reproduction"

“The sphere of [ an artwork’s ] authenticity is independent of its copy, so through the act of reproduction something is taken from the original by changing its context.” ­ Benjamin

In his ground­breaking essay, W. Benjamin worried that our new­found ability to reproduce art would erode its impact and value. Historically art was held in controlled contexts for controlled viewers ­ either by private citizens for private viewings or by religious institutions for use in controlled and liturgical contexts.

One of Benjamin’s major anxieties was that significance could not persist without scarcity. What would it mean if the Mona Lisa could look down at you from above your toilet, or the Scream from your angsty teenage son’s bedroom door? In the same sense, does a technologically reproducible classroom and curriculum threaten a student’s perceived value and impact of their learning in the same way?

This paper explores these questions in the context of Educational Technologists such as Ice, pedagogs such as Vygotsky, Media Theorists such as Bryant and Zillmann and some prominent members of the cannon of continental aesthetes and wraps the discussion in a survey of instructional design and technology.

As technologists and educators, how do we insure that adding reproducibility and portability to our classrooms and curriculums does not strike what is most human and significant from it? How do we maintain context despite mobility? How can we use portability to increase the value of a thing and instill expectations of excellence without requiring elitism. 


Moderators
AS

Amanda Steiman

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers

Friday January 13, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Colombard

11:15am

Targus Focus Session 2

Since creating the first laptop case more than 30 years ago, Targus has been a leader in the mobile computing accessories category, creating a market around enabling mobile business professionals and earning the trust of many of the world’s largest corporations.

Our understanding of evolving business needs and emerging technologies combined with our quality standards continues to advance the category with innovative, productivity-boosting solutions that enable an ever-changing workforce to perform at their best – anytime, anywhere.

Please visit us in the MiTE exhibit area to see the comprehensive “protect and connect” product portfolio from Targus including backpacks, briefcases, rollers, tablet cases, universal docks, locks, power devices, privacy screens and many other mobile computing accessories.

 http://www.targus.com/us/ 


Speakers
avatar for David Dorantes

David Dorantes

Director of Product Marketing, Targus



Friday January 13, 2017 11:15am - 11:45am
Moselle

11:45am

Lunch and Presentations
Limited Capacity seats available

Friday Lunch and Presentation

Presenters:
  • MiTE 2017 Conference Co-Sponsor, Dr. Sharon Russell, CalStateTEACH
  • MiTE 2017 Conference Co-Sponsor, Dr. Michael Spagna, CSU Northridge
  • Targus Director of Product Marketing, David Dorantes
  • President at 1010 Technology LLC, Roger Wagner
  • Apple Education Development Executive, Jay Matheson

Speakers
avatar for David Dorantes

David Dorantes

Director of Product Marketing, Targus
avatar for Jay Matheson

Jay Matheson

Education Development Executive, Apple
avatar for Sharon Russell

Sharon Russell

Systemwide Director, CalStateTEACH, the CSU
Dr. Sharon E. Russell is the Statewide Director of the CalStateTEACH Program. She has directed teacher preparation programs at various institutions. In California, she has been an active participant in the Learning to Teach Continuum, directing a multi- district university intern... Read More →
avatar for Michael Spagna

Michael Spagna

Dean of the Michael D. Eisner College of Education, California State University, Northridge
avatar for Roger Wagner

Roger Wagner

Founder & Inventor, HyperDuino MakerBit
Former physics, chemistry and math teacher, designer of HyperStudio. Named by Technology & Learning Magazine as one of the top 5 "Most Important Educational Technology Gurus of the Past Two Decades". Recently served on the Board of Directors of a state educational technology organization... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 11:45am - 1:15pm
Continental Ballroom

1:30pm

Apple Workshop 1: Everyone Can Code
Learn about Everyone Can Code, a new approach to coding that gives everyone the power to learn, write, and teach code. Hear about Swift Playgrounds, an app for iPad that makes getting started with coding fun and interactive, and take a look at the accompanying teacher guide. Also explore App Development with Swift, a high school and college curriculum for Mac that shows students how to create apps from start to finish.
 
Technology Requirements for Apple’s Learning to Code:
The Learn to Code 1 Playground is loaded from within the Swift Playgrounds app as shown in this 45 second video: https://vimeo.com/197949768/650b6842d4 

General information on Swift playgrounds is available here: http://www.apple.com/swift/playgrounds/.

Friday January 13, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Bordeaux

1:30pm

Apple Workshop 2: Everyone Can Code
Learn about Everyone Can Code, a new approach to coding that gives everyone the power to learn, write, and teach code. Hear about Swift Playgrounds, an app for iPad that makes getting started with coding fun and interactive, and take a look at the accompanying teacher guide. Also explore App Development with Swift, a high school and college curriculum for Mac that shows students how to create apps from start to finish.
 
Technology Requirements for Apple’s Learning to Code:
The Learn to Code 1 Playground is loaded from within the Swift Playgrounds app as shown in this 45 second video: https://vimeo.com/197949768/650b6842d4 

General information on Swift playgrounds is available here: http://www.apple.com/swift/playgrounds/.

Speakers
avatar for Elaine Wrenn

Elaine Wrenn

Director of Educational Leadership, Knowing Technologies
Elaine Wrenn serves as the Director of Educational Leadership and Strategy in Southern California at Knowing Technologies. She began her career as a teacher at The Lab School at UCLA and served at Echo Horizon School for 24 years in a variety of roles including Assistant Head of School... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Burgundy

1:30pm

Apple Workshop 3: Become an Apple Teacher
Learn about Apple Teacher—a new program to help educators unlock the magic of Apple products in the classroom. Get tips and hear about classroom successes of educators who’ve earned Apple Teacher badges. Learn about starter guides that are designed to train teachers on the fundamentals of using iPad, Mac, and built-in apps. And find out to sign up, earn badges by testing your knowledge, and then receive an official Apple Teacher logo to share your achievement with the world. 

Friday January 13, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Colombard

1:30pm

Apple Workshop 4: Become an Apple Teacher
Limited Capacity seats available

Learn about Apple Teacher—a new program to help educators unlock the magic of Apple products in the classroom. Get tips and hear about classroom successes of educators who’ve earned Apple Teacher badges. Learn about starter guides that are designed to train teachers on the fundamentals of using iPad, Mac, and built-in apps. And find out to sign up, earn badges by testing your knowledge, and then receive an official Apple Teacher logo to share your achievement with the world. 

Speakers
avatar for Sabba Quidai

Sabba Quidai

Apple Inc., Education Development Executive


Friday January 13, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Moselle

1:30pm

Apple Workshop 5: Managing Change
You have great ideas and a vision for the future but can you move your people to follow a new path? Leading and managing change is challenging and complicated, typically shrouded in uncertainty, and affected by unintended consequences. In this engaging workshop, we will look at change through the lens of a leader. We will identify three different reactions to change and help you identify the strengths of your core team. You will leave the session with a fresh perspective on change management and new tools to use to support your next great initiative.

(Located Upstairs) 

Speakers
avatar for Jay Matheson

Jay Matheson

Education Development Executive, Apple


Friday January 13, 2017 1:30pm - 2:30pm
Monterey & Mendocino

2:30pm

PM Break
Break

Friday January 13, 2017 2:30pm - 2:45pm
Continental Ballroom

2:45pm

"How to Learn with Your Mobile Device: Tech-enabled strategies to foster student self-awareness, motivation, metacognition and digital literacy"

Most students go through their entire academic career without learning how to learn! I, myself, did not learn about metacognition until my first year in a graduate program in Education. That's why I created "How 2 Lrn w ur Mobile Device" (also known as "How 2 Lrn w ur iPod, iPhone, iPad, Android, etc.").

I have shared self-awareness and metacognition strategies with middle school and high school students through after-school workshops, and with college students in an online, semester-long, General Education class. At all levels, students learn how they affect their own learning, how to improve their learning with metacognitive strategies, and how to use technology to support different parts of the learning process. Students today are media producers as much as consumers, so we also look at how those skills fit in the learning context.

On the flip side, we as teachers and teacher educators can use technology to foster students' self-awareness, increase their motivation to learn, provide avenues for students to improve their learning, and promote the development of digital literacy skills. Even if we cannot devote much class time to these activities, we can get students started on the path.

In this interactive MiTE2017 session we will:

  • Review a number of tech-enabled learning strategies that students can use inside and outside the classroom
  • Outline the digital literacy skills that today's students need to be successful learners
  • Investigate a variety of mobile apps, online tools and websites that students can use to support different aspects of learning
  • Discuss how we as teachers and teacher educators can use technology to foster student self-awareness and support student metacognition 

Moderators
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →

Speakers

Friday January 13, 2017 2:45pm - 3:05pm
Bordeaux

2:45pm

"Mobile & Global Digital Storytelling--Can You Tell A Story in six seconds? Bring your phone and learn how"

Can you tell a story in 6 seconds using just your mobile phone? Mobile tech is app-smashing its way into digital storytelling with international and intergenerational participants. Mobile digital storytelling is an innovative outreach beyond academic programs silos. Mobile digital storytelling for intergenerational studies innovates and leverages technology to connect students with life events beyond the campus, merging interdisciplinary academic concepts, combating intergenerational stereotypes, and changing perceptions.

This presentation, driven by QR-coded resources and international co-participation, explains how mobile technology, apps, and student enthusiasm converge to increase awareness of global issues, confront stereotypes, spark conversations, and build advocacy dialogues for social justice all through an interdisciplinary learning experience. 

References:

Barab, S. A., & Duffy, T. (2000). From practice fields to communities of practice. Theoretical foundations of learning environments, 1(1), 25-55.

Beare, K. (2008) Youtube in the Classroom! Retrieved from:

http://esl.about.com/od/listeninglessonplans/a/youtube.htm

Deci, E. L., & Ryan, R. M. (1975). Intrinsic motivation. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Hodgkinson-Williams, C., & Cox, G. (2015). Open educational resources. Moving beyond the hype: A contextualised view of learning with technology in higher education, 37.

Koh, Angeline. International Digital Storyteller, Singapor. Personal Communication, Singapore. March 15, 2015.

Kress, G. (2010) Multimodality: A social semiotic approach to contemporary communication. London: Routledge.

Nikolich-Žugich, J., Goldman, D. P., Cohen, P. R., Cortese, D., Fontana, L., Kennedy, B. K., Mohler, M.J., Olshansky, S.J., Perls, T., Perry, D. & Richardson, A. (2015). Preparing for an aging world: Engaging Biogerontologists, Geriatricians, and the Society. The Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, J Gertontology A Biol Sci Med Sci, 2016, Vol.71, No. 4, p. 435-444. doi: 10.1093/gerona/glv164

Peterson, P. G. (1999). Gray dawn: how the coming age wave will transform America-- and the world.

United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2013).

World Population Ageing 2013. ST/ESA/SER.A/348.

Wenger, E., & Lave, J. (1991). Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation (Learning in Doing: Social, Cognitive, and Computational Perspectives) by Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.

Wenger, E. (1998). Communities of practice: Learning as a social system. Systems Thinker, 9(5), 2-3.

World Health Organization. (2011). Global health and aging. Bethesda: National Institutes of Health.


Moderators
BR

Barbara Ricchio

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Helen Teague

Helen Teague

Student / Online Course Facilitator, Pepperdine University & PBS TeacherLine
Helen Teague is a 4th generation native Californian. She just finished defending her dissertation in Learning and Technology from Pepperdine University. Helen also holds Master of Education (Curriculum & Instruction, Gifted Education, and School Administration) and a Bachelor of Business... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 2:45pm - 3:05pm
Burgundy

2:45pm

"Mobile Teaching and Learning in Teacher Education Comparative Case Studies in South Africa and The United States"

Mobile teaching and learning in this study was based on the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework described by Koehler and Mishra (2006) that has become ubiquitous in the educational technology field. Within this framework, the most effective teaching takes place at the dynamic intersection of three areas of teacher knowledge: content, pedagogy, and technology (Koehler & Mishra, 2009). This framework builds on Shulman’s (1987) concept of Pedagogical Content Knowledge, knowledge of pedagogy useful for teaching specific content.

Many pre-service teachers begin to integrate technology by focusing on Technology Knowledge, or the intersection of Technology Knowledge and Content Knowledge, as they learn how to use the components of technology. The next step for pre-service teacher is to focus on the intersection of Technology Knowledge and Pedagogical Knowledge, using new technology to replace an existing practice, such as completing a worksheet online. The final step occurs when a teacher understands each component and focuses on the intersection of Technology, Pedagogy, and Content: here technology facilitates teaching and learning processes in new and innovative ways. An example would be teaching writing content using process writing pedagogy with feedback, edits, and revisions using a blog format to allow students to write with and receive feedback from students at another school or in another country. This type of global, collaborative writing could not be done without the use of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge in teaching. The present study focused on instilling this framework in preservice teachers to plan and teach using TPACK.

At the same time, the affordances of technology depend on local contexts such as the availability of broadband internet, wifi bandwidth and the availability of devices and apps. To examine the impact of educational and technological contexts we compared technology integration courses in South Africa and the United States.

We chose to compare the use of mobile technology in five cases. We focus on the US as one of the world leaders in education and more specifically technology integration and South Africa as a leading nation in Africa and concurrently a country going through a period of revitalization in Education as part of the post-apartheid period. In each country, we chose a teacher education program embedded in a research university and a teacher education programs in local non- research universities or colleges.

The comparative case studies used three sources of information for the comparison. First, we used course syllabi to analyze philosophical approaches, goals and intensity of technology integration. Second, we examined the expectations of course assignments and their respective emphasis on TPACK. Finally, we examined a subset of Keystone student assignment performance from each course to see the levels of pre-service teacher ability to use TPACK effectively.

Results indicated that content and expectation in the courses were very similar in nature. Courses in both countries and both types of institutions set high expectations and created a complex set of assignments for pre-service teachers. The constraints of physical technology infrastructure in South Africa has limited the ability of South African pre-service teachers to use their new knowledge of mobile technologies in classrooms leaving their keystone products with lower levels of TPACK integration.

In the presentation, we will show exemplars and expand suggest ways of adapting TPACK models to local conditions.

References

Koehler, M., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK)?. Contemporary issues in technology and teacher education, 9, 60-70.

Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P., Bouck, E. C., DeSchryver, M., Kereluik, K., Shin, T. S., & Wolf, L. G. (2011). Deep-play: Developing TPACK for 21st century teachers. International Journal of Learning Technology, 6, 146-163.

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. (2006). Technological pedagogical Content Knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108 (6), 1017-1054.

Shulman, L. (1987). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of the new reform. Harvard Educational Review, 87(1), 1-21. 


Moderators
SC

Shawn Carey

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Breanne Campbell

Breanne Campbell

Adjunct Professor, University of Nebraska-Omaha
Secondary English, Teacher Education, Instructional Technology, Multiliteracies and New Literacies Studies
UO

University of Nebraska Lincoln TLTE

Professor and Chair, University of Nebraska Lincoln TLTE
UNL Graduate Programs, BMIT, and Code.org Partner


Friday January 13, 2017 2:45pm - 3:05pm
Colombard

2:45pm

"Technology Implementation Initiatives"

Over the past several decades, technology implementation in schools has been a major reform effort (Culp, Honey, & Mandinach, 2005). Conversations in the United States around transforming teaching and learning via the use of technology is being fueled at the national level by initiatives such as President Obama’s Future Ready Call to Action and P21’s Framework for 21st Century Learning. These initiatives are encouraging educators, students, and communities to commit to preparing students to be critical thinkers, problem solvers, communicators, and innovators (P21 Partnership for 21st Century Learning, 2009). This presentation will share promising practices and common pitfalls when implementing 1:1 technology initiatives in large urban districts. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative methods, researchers studied three technology initiatives in urban public school districts to understand the factors influencing implementation outcomes. Presenters will discuss the implications of implementation on teacher pedagogy, professional development and offer critical insights for educators and policymakers engaged in both research and practitioner efforts in these areas.


Moderators
CF

Casey Fair

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
VG

Veronica Garza

Assistant Director of Research, University of San Diego


Friday January 13, 2017 2:45pm - 3:05pm
Moselle

2:45pm

"Become an iBooks Author"
Limited Capacity filling up

Speakers
avatar for Michael Mills

Michael Mills

Associate Professor, University of Central Arkansas
Dr. Michael Mills, Assistant Professor of Teaching and Learning at the University of Central Arkansas, is a leading expert on the practical uses of educational technology, particularly on using collaborative tools to better engage students and to design strategies for effectively... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 2:45pm - 3:45pm
Monterey & Mendocino

3:10pm

"Experiences and Challenges of Preservice Teacher Interns Enrolled in a 1 to 1 Teacher Education Program."

How is student teaching (interning) changed when you are not enrolled in a teacher education which is one to one with iPads? What unique challenges do students face?
As early as 1996, in the National Educational Technology Plan, the Department of Education has called upon Colleges of Education to improve the experience of future teachers related to technology integration to achieve technology literacy (USDOE, 1996). The current National Educational Technology Plan (USDOE, 2016) takes it a step further when they say that no new teacher should require remediation by their new district to make meaningful use of technology to achieve state or national standards or prepare students to be successful on assessments (USDOE, 2016). Dexter & Reidel (2003) shared the assertion that colleges of education have a responsibility to prepare students to use technology but admit it is difficult to manage. it is not only affected by access to computing technology but also their instructional supports available within the University and educational settings (Dexter & Reidel, 2003)

In order to evaluate this call to action in practice. Student intern teachers (n=51) during the third year of a one to one teacher education iPad program were asked to reflect on their technology use during student teaching. These were the first students who had used iPads throughout their teacher education coursework. Students were asked to complete a survey during their intern teaching day using their iPads or Smartphone. The study used Experience Sampling Method (ESM). ESM is a method where participants are prompted to complete a survey or reflection throughout their day to obtain “just in time” reflection while they are engaged in an activity (Csikszentmihalyi, & Larson 1987). ESM was performed using a combination of Remind.com text messages and a Google Form to capture their experiences on different days and during different times during the day. After completing this surveys, the interns were provided with a printout of their reflections. Then during one class session, they summarized their daily sampled reflections and also participated in a class discussion. Data collected both in online and paper­ based summative reflections was subjected to content analysis and triangulated with classroom discussions. The responses showed that interns tended toward teacher­focused uses of technology and were frustrated by their inability to use technology. They experienced both first and second order barriers (Becker, 1999; Ertmer, 2005). Some of the challenges due to infrastructure included lack of access to WIFI on their college devices, and overall lack of access to school file systems and software (i.e.. not given a GAFE account to be able to collaborate with cooperating teachers or interact with student work or not given access to Smart Notebook software to be able to plan and develop technology enhanced lessons). They also experienced issues with teacher beliefs of their cooperating teachers. These issues ranged from fear of technology or remaining focused on existing curriculum that “worked”. We plan to talk about the follow up to this study that included a meeting with tech leaders at partner schools to ascertain how we could improve access and better allow students to integrate technology and offering PD to both inservice and preservice teachers to improve their technology integration skills.

References:

Becker, H. J. (1999). Internet use by teachers: conditions of professional use and teacher­directed student use. Teaching, Learning and Computer: 1998 National Survey, Retrieved from

http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED429564.pdf

Csikszentmihalyi, M., & Larson, R. (1987). Validity and reliability of the experience­sampling method. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 175(9), 526­536.

Dexter,S., & Riedel, E., (2003). Why Improving Preservice Teacher Educational Technology prep ara tion must go beyond the college’s walls. Journal of Teacher Education, 54(4). Doi: 10.1177/0022487103255319

Ertmer, P. A. (2005). Teacher pedagogical beliefs: The final frontier in our quest for technology integration?. Educational Technology Research and Development, 53(4), 25­39.
USDOE (US Department of Education) (1996) National Education Technology Plan. Available at: http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED398899.pdf

USDOE (US Department of Education). (2016). Future ready: Reimagining the role of technology in education. Washington, D.C. Retrieved from: http://tech.ed.gov/netp/ 


Moderators
KH

Kari Hazen

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Theresa Cullen

Dr. Theresa Cullen

Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma
Theresa A. Cullen is an Associate Professor in Instructional Psychology and Technology at the University of Oklahoma where she coordinates the undergraduate technology integration courses and the 1 to 1 iPad program for all undergraduate teacher education students. She was named an... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 3:10pm - 3:30pm
Burgundy

3:10pm

"Game on: designing, developing and evaluating a simulation game to develop school leaders"

This session looks at early stages of a PhD focused on the design, iterative development and evaluation of the effectiveness of a 3D computer-based simulation game for aspiring school leaders, in which the player is required to run a school for a day, interacting with non-player characters and receiving feedback from a virtual coach. 

There are a number of potential benefits to the use of simulation games within learning and development. These include being able to speed up or slow down time in so that processes or outcomes become easier to observe and participants receive rapid feedback on their decisions, and being able to repeat or re-run a simulation in order to try out different ideas, something which is rarely possible outside of a simulation environment. Computer-based simulations are therefore widely used as part of training programs across military, healthcare and corporate organisations, primarily where practising or assessing a skill in a ‘real-life’ situation would be expensive, dangerous or time-consuming.

In line with medical or military trainees, opportunities for classroom experience during teacher training programs are seen as vitally important; however, this can be hard to deliver in a low-consequence context that allows teachers to truly explore and experiment with their classroom practice. The potential benefits of simulation use mean that despite the challenge of simulating less clearly defined skills, there have been some attempts to develop computer simulations to help build teaching skills, including Ferry & Kervin's (2007) simulated classroom in which participants make decisions around classroom management, and SimSchool, designed for use in teacher training, which takes a more feedback and assessment-focused stance (Gibson 2007). However, there has previously been limited focus on use of simulation in school leadership; the Penn Educational Leadership Simulation program, the ‘In the Centre of Things (ITCOT)’ simulation of decision making during school improvement (Peterson 2001), and Administrator Case Simulation (Lopes et al., 2013) are all closer to branching scenarios than true simulation. 


Moderators
VM

Vivian Mun

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Scutt

Catherine Scutt

Head of Learning Technology and Innovation, Girls' Day School Trust
Passionate about teaching and learning, research, CPD, creating communities, and effective use of digital technology.


Friday January 13, 2017 3:10pm - 3:30pm
Bordeaux

3:10pm

"Good Teacher edtech leads to #TPACK and Efficacy"
In this session, we will describe a study of the impact of the UNL TechEDGE program on students in an Elementary teacher education program. The primary purpose of the study was to examine the growth in elementary preservice teachers’ self-efficacy and frequency of technology integration into various subject areas as a teacher preparation program attempted to teach preservice teachers how to integrate technologies into instruction in elementary classrooms. A secondary purpose was to investigate whether technological knowledge of preservice teachers and teacher program modeling predict preservice teachers’ self-efficacy and frequency of technology integration. Data from 554 preservice teachers were analyzed to examine these issues.

The model we use shows the integration of the different elements that must come together to impact technology integration success and the subsequent impact on student achievement. Teacher education program impacts TPACK knowledge and procedures and Technology self-efficacy- two key components in explaining successful educationally relevant technology integration. Environmental supports moderate any impact of the learning and motivation of preservice teachers to use technology in the classroom. Instructional change led to students achievement on a variety of outcomes including subject specific knowledge, technology knowledge, and learning strategies. Following the logic expressed by Guskey (2002) we suggest that implementation creates a feedback loop that further impacts TPACK knowledge and self-efficacy.

Moderators
ML

Margaret Leon

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
UO

University of Nebraska Lincoln TLTE

Professor and Chair, University of Nebraska Lincoln TLTE
UNL Graduate Programs, BMIT, and Code.org Partner



Friday January 13, 2017 3:10pm - 3:30pm
Colombard

3:10pm

"Project PRIME: Findings to inform SmartLabs in K-8 Math and Science "
To increase student interest and achievement in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), three schools with a large population of military dependent children purchased iPads for students and installed SmartLabs. With a focus on technology integration support, teachers received professional development and coaching from Teachers on Special Assignment (TOSAs) on how to use and incorporate technology into their instruction. They also attended SmartLabs with their classes designed to enhance students’ mathematics and science achievement and influence their teaching in these areas. For this presentation, the impact of SmartLabs on teachers’ math and science instruction is examined.

Moderators
avatar for Christine Lam

Christine Lam

Faculty, N/A

Speakers
avatar for Katherine Nilsen

Katherine Nilsen

Research Associate, University of San Diego



Friday January 13, 2017 3:10pm - 3:30pm
Moselle

3:30pm

Kensington Focus Session 1

Kensington is really interested in your opinion as it relates to your mobility protection, charging, docking, and input/output needs.  We have been a leader in the mobile computing accessories category for almost 40 years and have done this by trading samples for advice.

We would like you to come to our focus group meeting at 3:30 and 5:00 PM, and help us build better products for education.  We will trade rugged iPad and Chromebook cases, charging cabinets, USB universal docking stations, privacy screens, Sit/Stand stations, etc., for your willingness to tell us how to make our products in the best way for your use.

https://www.kensington.com/us/us/home  


Speakers
avatar for David Peterson

David Peterson

Kensington Technology Group
Kensington would like to trade free samples of wireless screencast and presentaters, headphones, USB docking stations, Sit/Stands, charging cabinets, and rugged cases with no strings attached, for informal advice on how to make our products better.




Friday January 13, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
Moselle

5:00pm

Kensington Focus Session 2

Kensington is really interested in your opinion as it relates to your mobility protection, charging, docking, and input/output needs.  We have been a leader in the mobile computing accessories category for almost 40 years and have done this by trading samples for advice.

We would like you to come to our focus group meeting at 3:30 and 5:00 PM, and help us build better products for education.  We will trade rugged iPad and Chromebook cases, charging cabinets, USB universal docking stations, privacy screens, Sit/Stand stations, etc., for your willingness to tell us how to make our products in the best way for your use.

https://www.kensington.com/us/us/home  


Speakers
avatar for David Peterson

David Peterson

Kensington Technology Group
Kensington would like to trade free samples of wireless screencast and presentaters, headphones, USB docking stations, Sit/Stands, charging cabinets, and rugged cases with no strings attached, for informal advice on how to make our products better.



Friday January 13, 2017 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Moselle

6:00pm

"EPIC Learning...Game on!"

session slides/resources available at bit.ly/epicfsd

How can you help your students Level Up and give them new opportunities for epic learning? Come experience how the Fullerton School District personalizes learning for over 4,000 students in grades 4-8 across Writing, Math, ELA, History, and Science/STEM. Combining an epic storyline with engaging, content rich activities, students become “Agents of Change” by using quests to progress through learning cycles so they can drive their own instructional needs and goals forward.

iPersonalize is a personalized blended learning platform with integrated gamified elements. Students are drawn into the program with its many cutting edge features. The program is gamified with experience points (XP), digital and physical badges, “leveling up” on leaderboards, and an engaging storyline. Elements of The Art and Science of Teaching by Dr. Robert Marzano and Visible Learning by Dr. John Hattie are the foundation to the learning and instructional components of iPersonalize. iPersonalize is rooted in Jane McGonigal’s book, Reality is Broken , as students experience flow and fiero in their own personalized learning journey. Many of Marzano’s strategies are interwoven in various aspects of the quests through learning cycles and rank above the 0.40 effect size of Hattie’s research. iPersonalize is endorsed by the Marzano Research Laboratory and is recognized as a program that uses an Instructional Design rooted in pedagogy and learning that is grounded in Marzano’s research on highly effective instruction.

Additionally, units of study are blended with learning experiences in the classroom, outside of the classroom, in teams, and on digital devices, such as iPads. Trends in the 2015 Horizon reports show an increase in blended learning and a “shift from students as consumers to creators.” iPersonalize give students the opportunity to apply their new knowledge to become problem-solvers of real-world situations and creators of passion projects. This personalized learning environment has Response to Intervention cycles integrated into the quests to ensure that students reach proficiency and/or mastery of skills.

Lastly, iPersonalize is a competency-based program that challenges students of all ability levels and provides teacher support while allowing students to move forward at their own pace. iPersonalize is a composite of all of the best strategies and methodologies used today to individualize students’ educational goals and passions.

This session will provide participants with the history of iPersonalize and gamification components to engage students. All participants will have a visual overview highlighting authentic student voice and showcasing work to an authentic audience through the use of learner profiles, epic storylines, learning cycles, learning scales, secret missions, and celebrating success. Participants will walk away with insight into how they could integrate elements of iPersonalize into their own content instruction. 


Speakers
avatar for Ann Kozma

Ann Kozma

TOSA, Fullerton School District
TOSA in Fullerton, CA. Passionate about education technology. Enjoys helping others learn how to integrate tech to transform teaching and learning. Apple Distinguished Educator. Leading Edge Certified as a Professional Learning Leader. Google Level 2 Certified. 10+ years classroom... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"From NASA to your classroom- DELIVERING free NASA STEM PD RESOURCES FOR EDUCATORS"
The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative (EPDC) is led by Texas State University and a network of education and technology experts from other Hispanic Servings Institutions, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribal Colleges. We collaborate directly with NASA STEM education professionals to deliver quality learning experiences and resources. 

ONLINE WEBINARS & WORKSHOPS 

NASA Education Specialists present STEM content, activities, teaching strategies and other resources to bring NASA into your classroom. 

LEARNING EVENTS AT NASA CENTERS 

Attend special learning events at your local NASA Center. Tour facilities and learn about cutting edge technologies. 

FLEXIBLE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT 

Learn at your own speed. Earn certificates, continuing education credits, and STEM Learning Badges. 

Speakers
avatar for Otto Benavides

Otto Benavides

Emeritus Professor, Fresno State
Super friendly and great guy!
avatar for Karen Roark

Karen Roark

EPD Specialist, NASA Ames Research Center/Texas State


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Animation as an Instructional and Motivational Tool for Teachers"

Animation as a motivational tool promotes autonomous behavior and increases the student’s ability to self regulate behavior and to manage and control one’s own actions.  Teachers who use animation in their classrooms will notice high levels of engagement, intrinsic motivation, cooperation and collaboration.  When students are intrinsically motivated they become goal oriented and able to sustain goal-oriented behavior, which results in positive learning outcomes and products (Ryan & Deci, 2000).  

In the summer of 2016, CalstateTEACH provided animation training to over 100 teacher candidates and faculty in preparation for summer school teaching placements.  The first and second year teacher candidates received up to six hours of training in using iPad mobile devices to teach animation.  Using an inquiry based workshop model, teacher candidates were engaged in creating their own animations using two iPad animation applications (iMotion and Animatic) and a HTML 5 internet-based animation program called Mugeda.  The workshops addressed the instructional technology, pedagogy and skills needed for teaching animation using direct and inquiry based teaching methods demonstrating how animation can be used as an engagement and motivational strategy and as a collaboration tool in elementary level classrooms. 

Animation is a 21st century teaching and learning tool that makes learning accessible and exciting for both students and teachers. Visual media provides an engaging pathway for students to explore and understand academic content. It requires students to use many of the 21st century skills that will be needed for future career and college readiness. It is through active exploration, autonomous learning, creativity, communication and problem solving that students are able to acquire the technical skills and thinking strategies needed for career and college success.

Reference

Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American psychologist, 55(1), 68.


Speakers
avatar for Donald Matthews

Donald Matthews

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Computer Science Experience"
Join us for a series of fun activities demonstrating how students can investigate and experience the fundamental concepts of computer science within their physical environment.  This is a pumped up take on Computer Science Unplugged.

Speakers
BV

Brian Van Dyck

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Develop a global mindset & build empathy in your Ss by incorporating international digital storytelling field trips into your curriculum"

After successful student documentary trips to countries like Cuba, Cambodia and Vietnam, I have seen the profound mindshift that occurs when students engage the world and make their learning experiential. By conducting field research and creating digital stories about their experiences (through photography, film, blogs, etc.), content comes alive for students and their projects can then be shared with a wider audience so as to have an impact on society.

This poster session will discuss how field trips abroad can be used to create a global mindset with students and create empathy for underrepresented groups and cultures. These types of investigative, reflective and documentary projects are important in higher ed settings because they allow students to understand content more deeply, allow them to address a topic in ways that best suit their strengths and passions, and provides opportunities for interdisciplinary, collaborative learning. The session will discuss how to incorporate digital storytelling field trips into all subject areas, as well as the logistics of how to plan, produce and publish digital stories. 


Speakers
avatar for Michael Hernandez

Michael Hernandez

Educator speaker and author
With nearly two decades of experience, Michael brings practical classroom knowledge to bear when developing innovative teaching and learning strategies, and helping others do the same in their schools. His goal is to empower students and teachers to affect positive change in their... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Inquiry and Innovation Time: Where Student Passions and Design Thinking Intersect"

This goal of this poster session is to inform and inspire educators to create opportunities for students to pursue their passions while developing solutions to real world problems and gaining important skills for lifelong learning including perseverance, growth mindset, critical thinking, problem solving, research, communication, collaboration, and creativity. Many teachers are currently experimenting with Genius Hour or 20% Time projects, giving students time to explore their passions. This session will share the development & implementation of a 3rd-6th grade school wide inquiry & innovation program in an elementary school setting. In this program, students utilized design thinking, a human-centered empathy based approach to problem solving and innovation, as a framework for their process. Follow the 25 week journey our students took from identifying areas where they wanted to make an impact and skills they wanted to learn to identifying and prototyping innovative ways to address a problem, to reflecting on their process in an i2 Talk for the school community. Students worked in multiple flexible learning environments throughout the school in projects that involved construction, robotics, electronics, coding, app and game design, textiles, dancing, art, cooking, and video production. See the many opportunities for authentic use of mobile technology in research, connecting with users, prototyping, communicating, facilitating, documenting, reflecting, and sharing. While this particular implementation took place in upper elementary, it is relevant for educators in grades 3-12. Come find inspiration and practical ideas for implementing a similar program.


Speakers
avatar for Elaine Wrenn

Elaine Wrenn

Director of Educational Leadership, Knowing Technologies
Elaine Wrenn serves as the Director of Educational Leadership and Strategy in Southern California at Knowing Technologies. She began her career as a teacher at The Lab School at UCLA and served at Echo Horizon School for 24 years in a variety of roles including Assistant Head of School... Read More →



Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Nearpod and the Impact on Progress Monitoring"

Progress monitoring is a practice used to determine students’ academic performance, measure their degree of improvement, and assess the efficacy of instruction (Center on Response to Intervention). It is the one method of assessment that instructors can promptly give, interpret results, and alter instruction to maintain and promote sufficient improvement of reading skills. Consequently, teachers who consistently implement progress-monitoring instruments improve student achievement and are more apt to modify instruction to meet the needs of their students (Santi & Vaughn, 2007).

The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine whether the Nearpod app, an interactive technology application, served as an effective method to monitor students' progress and check for understanding during instruction. The participants consisted of two teacher candidates in their final term of their clinical experience practicum. Both student teachers taught at a Title 1 school in Tustin, California. The school demographics consisted of 49% socioeconomically disadvantaged students and 26.4% English Learners. The experimental group student teacher used Nearpod to check for understanding and perform progress monitoring in a 2/3 combination grade classroom comprised of 31 students. In the control group setting, the other student teacher in a 3rd grade classroom of 32 students in did not use Nearpod for progress monitoring. Instead, she used traditional progress monitoring methods during instruction. The methods used for progress monitoring included think-pair-share, thumbs up/thumbs down, brainstorming maps, and calling on students randomly using name sticks. Data was gathered through:

1. Pre- and post-videotaped lessons;
2. In-person observations of teaching in a classroom setting;
3. Printed reports showing data of the frequency of student participation during the lesson and final scores on quizzes;
4. Student teacher written reflections of the learning outcomes;
5. Conferences with the student teachers. 

The results of the study indicated that the use of the Nearpod app (student responder) improved student engagement and whole group assessment in a single lesson. This project is relevant and important to the field of teacher education because it allows candidates to practice how to effectively improve student learning in the classroom. The data showed that the candidate, who utilized the Nearpod app for progress monitoring, developed the skills to obtain accurate information and to determine to what extent the students met lesson objectives. In addition, this candidate referred to the data in written reflections that guided future instruction. 


Speakers
avatar for Laura McKay

Laura McKay

Faculty, CalStateTEACH
Laura is faculty with the CalStateTEACH Program in the Southern California region. Laura joined CalStateTEACH in 2000. Her role is to supervise, coach, and facilitate instruction with multiple-subject K-12 teacher candidates using the latest educational-based technologies. She presented... Read More →
GR

Georgi Ravenna

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Using iPad for Critical Digital Reflection of Practice"
Speakers
avatar for Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Program director, NUI Galway
I am interested in all of the following! Assessment, reflection, using mobile technology for assessment and peer feedback. Initial teacher education. Language learning, active learning. Using the ipad on the go - for organisation, for taking notes, for sketchnoting, to connect with... Read More →
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Using mobile technology to share our learning about STEM with our community-our world"

We will outline STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) outcomes and teacher candidate growth through use of mobile technology. We will present this in a video poster showing how we used iPads to program and control Lego Robots (WeDo 2.0), hands on science inquiries, and “in the ield” experiences in the science rich environment of Turtle Bay Exploration Park. Set up for this presentation will involve the use of
three iPADs featuring the following work:

  1. Lego robotics. iPads were used to design and program movement through coding in order to problem solve use of robots. Robots had task challenges such as moving objects speci ic distances following coded instructions.

  2. Google + Community (images captured by teacher candidates and support faculty) We demonstrate how using mobile technology and Google + Community allowed us to bring families and the larger education community into our learning environment.

  3. Video taped inquiry based experiments showing STEM in action (Sailboats, water rockets). Use of video was embraced to guide professional development allowing candidates to see how to improve the learning experience of students by coming back to the lab to re-engineer their projects. Students participating in the summer camp also utilized mobile technology to record indings and make decisions for re-design. 


Speakers
avatar for Karen DeVoogd

Karen DeVoogd

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

CST Faculty
avatar for Karen Beasley

Karen Beasley

College/University, California State University Fresno
avatar for Linda Lawhon

Linda Lawhon

College/University, Fresno State University


Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

6:00pm

"Using Performance Expectations and Annotated Video to Facilitate Reflection"

This session demonstrates CalStateTEACH teacher education program innovation via the Observation Event. Using electronic lesson plans, preconference self-evaluation, rationale for proficiency level performance, and a video feedback loop for teacher candidates are combined for the purpose of documenting candidate progress toward the goal of attaining a teaching credential.

The Observation Event (OE) is a technology interface including:

- Lesson plan creation with pre-delivery selection of pedagogical proficiency levels.
- Live marking of pedagogical proficiency levels by faculty.
- Video recording option with audio enhancement of the delivered lesson.
- Video annotation option to facilitate dialog between the credential candidate and faculty.

The OE was developed to give credential candidates more control over the classroom observation process by determining the lesson focus and pedagogical proficiency levels based on California Teaching Performance Expectations (TPE) (Commission for Teacher Credentialing, 2013). Candidates begin by completing a lesson plan and choosing two or three TPEs indicating which aspects of teaching they intend to demonstrate and providing a rationale for that expectation.

The electronic lesson plan becomes the script for the observation visit by the assigned faculty. Feedback to the candidates on the TPEs identified and other TPEs observed is collected electronically from each OE. At a school site, the candidate’s lesson plan and associated pre-conference information is visible on the faculty’s iPad as the lesson occurs. Faculty can make suggestions and observations that relate to what is taking place without having to retype a narration of what is occurring.

Observation visits can also be performed “virtually.” The candidate creates a video as the lesson is taught. Following the lesson, the candidate uses a unique annotation feature to make reflective comments as the recorded lesson plays and then sends the video recorded lesson attached to a lesson plan to a faculty mentor for review. The faculty mentor views the video with the electronic lesson plan open and can type formative feedback comments in the observation event form and can also make annotation comments, or respond to the candidate’s reflective statements. This ability to video record classroom observations facilitates teacher candidate self-reflection and self-assessment (Rich & Hannafin, 2009).

OUTLINE

We will demonstrate the Observation Event (OE) protocol and the Video Event Capture an Annotation tool. During the poster session attendees will explore how video feedback to our CalStateTEACH. Then if attendees have there BYOD we will have them complete a short Observation Event (OE).


Speakers
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →



Friday January 13, 2017 6:00pm - 7:00pm
Continental Ball Room Foyer

7:00pm

MiTE Banquet and Dance
  • 7:00 pm- 8:00 pm Dinner served 
  • 8:00 pm TED-O Teacher Educator Dance Off!

Moderators
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →


Friday January 13, 2017 7:00pm - 10:00pm
Continental Ballroom
 
Saturday, January 14
 

8:00am

Breakfast Buffet
Limited Capacity seats available

Saturday January 14, 2017 8:00am - 9:15am
Continental Ballroom

9:15am

A Talk with Clark Quinn: The Mobile Academy
In The Mobile Academy Clark Quinn gives aspiring learning technologists a crash course in what it will take to harness the power and potential of mobile learning in higher educational settings. He has given us a comprehensive, engaging guide for creating mobile learning solutions that inspire anytime, anywhere, and on whatever device one chooses. 

Moderators
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Clark Quinn

Clark Quinn

Executive Director, Quinnovation
Clark Quinn, Ph.D., is a recognized leader in learning technology strategy, helping organizations take advantage of information systems to meet learning, knowledge, and performance needs. His approach is learning experience design, combining what we know about how people think and... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 9:15am - 10:00am
Continental Ballroom

10:15am

"A case study of the affordances of iPad/mobility in Initial Teacher Education"

Mobile learning considers the process of learning mediated by handheld devices such as smart phones and tablet computers (Schuler, Winters & West 2012). The ubiquity and diverse capabilities of these technologies have created considerable interest amongst educators (Authors 2012; Foley & Reveles 2014; Johnson, Adams Becker, Estrada & Martín 2013) who seek to investigate their application for learning on the move (Sharples 2013) across a variety of formal and informal contexts. Students can now learn when, where and how suits them best and Initial Teacher Education can play a central role in the integration of this technology in the classroom. The challenge for teacher educators is to facilitate the ability of pre-service teachers to enhance their learning and teaching process through implementing and integrating mobile technology to support their teaching practices.

The National Education Technology Plan (US Department of Education, 2016) states “It is inaccurate to assume that because pre-service teachers are tech savvy in their personal lives they will understand how to use technology effectively to support learning without specific training and practice. This expertise does not come through the completion of one educational technology course separate from other methods courses but through the inclusion of experiences with educational technology in all courses modelled by the faculty in teacher preparation programs.”

Although pre-service teachers are expected to demonstrate their ability to integrate technology into their pedagogical practice, they are often deterred from doing so by technical problems, sometimes referred to as ‘first-order barriers,’ external to the student (Ertmer, 2005). More recently attention has shifted to ‘second-order barriers’, the internal factors which inhibit teachers from using technology such as their own attitudes and beliefs (Ertmer, Ottenbreit-Leftwich, Sadik, Sendurur & Sendurur, 2012).

The Digital Strategy 2015-20 now expects that the use of ICT will be embedded at each stage of the continuum of Teacher Education. (DES, 2015 ). This paper presents a case study of a 1:1 (one-to-one) iPad deployment on the Máistir Gairmiúil san Oideachas (MGO), a one year, Irish medium, Initial Teacher Education programme for post-primary teachers in Ireland. Mobile technology is integrated in all aspects of the programme rather than as a stand alone ‘Ed Tech module’. The resulting affordances for Mobile Learning in relation to digital portfolios, audio and video reflection, resource creation, peer assessment are discussed. The impact on student teachers’ and MGO graduates’ professional learning and pedagogical knowledge development will also be presented. 


Moderators
RE

Rebecca Evans

Curriculum Coordinator, CalStateTEACH
I am a founding member of the CalStateTEACH team and serve in the systemwide office as Curriculum Coordinator. My M.S. in Education focused on Online Teaching and Learning.

Speakers
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Burgundy

10:15am

"Producing a Multi-touch Book and Providing Experiential Learning Opportunities for Students"

Digital textbooks are becoming increasingly popular among K-12 and higher education markets, and one powerful aspect of these digital texts is how easily they can be created. Apple’s multi-touch books are the pre-eminent technology when it comes to the integration of media and interactive elements. Using the freely available iBooks Author, an instructor can work with students to create a textbook that provides a wealth of knowledge on almost any topic.  In addition to researching and writing, students are exposed to higher order digital literacy skills such as digital photography and video production. Much of this can be done within the classroom, although opportunities for field-based development should be explored.

In 2015, I was fortunate enough to be selected as an Apple Distinguished Educator (ADE) and spent 5 days in Miami working with educators from around the world on a variety of topics. At the end of the institute, we all were tasked with doing a project that would blend technology and education. I decided to be ambitious and developed an idea that would fuse the state parks of Georgia with a variety of history and science content standards required for our K-12 students. The result is a partnership with the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and I am in the process of visiting the parks and writing the multi-touch book. This is a significant undertaking that will span several years, but the resulting textbook should be useful to thousands of students and teachers across the state.

Throughout the process, I have involved many of my graduate students in the production of the book. They have traveled with me to the parks, documented the unique characteristics of each location, interviewed park personnel, conducted research on historical and scientific topics related to the park, and co-authored several chapters with me. This experiential learning has been very well-received among all of the students, with many of them stating that it was one of their favorite memories of graduate school.

It is clear that digital textbooks bring many advantages to the classroom. While some digital texts are simply PDF files designed to be read on a tablet or computer, there are more advanced books that not only contain text, but images, sound, video, interactive modules, and review questions. These books, such as the multi-touch format available for Apple’s iPad, take advantage of new technologies that allow students to interact and explore content in a way that traditional books simply cannot match. The digital natives that are populating our classrooms appreciate these new tools, including “the rich multimedia resources” (Liu, 2011). Perhaps an even greater benefit is the ease of which they can be created and utilized within a classroom. Considering the current push towards open resources and reduced student costs, faculty are being asked to find materials online or develop their own. This opens the door for collaboration with students across all grade levels and disciplines. Allowing students to author a digital textbook will help to create an environment where they feel empowered and are doing more than simply satisfying requirements for an assignment. Liu (2011) reports similar findings, noting that students had a feeling of control over their learning. Ruth (2013) notes that learners using digital textbooks have a more intimate experience with their materials, including the ability to alter the content.

The projected completion date for Georgia State Parks: A Guide for Educators is January of 2017. It will be published in Apple’s iBook Store as well as on Amazon, and will be made freely available for educators, students, and the general public.

References

Liu, H. (2011). What do the college millennial learners say about an open source digital textbook for a teacher education course? Journal of Technology Integration in the Classroom. 3(1), 17-21.

Ruth, K. (2013). Texts that change schools. Independent School. 72(4), 50-55.


Moderators
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Chris Greer

Chris Greer

Associate Professor, Georgia College and State University
I love to explore how to integrate more multimedia into the K-12 classroom.


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:15am - 10:35am
Moselle

10:15am

On going talk with Clark Quinn
Moderators
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Clark Quinn

Clark Quinn

Executive Director, Quinnovation
Clark Quinn, Ph.D., is a recognized leader in learning technology strategy, helping organizations take advantage of information systems to meet learning, knowledge, and performance needs. His approach is learning experience design, combining what we know about how people think and... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:15am - 11:00am
Continental Ballroom

10:40am

"A Perfect Pear: Student Engagement and PearDeck"

Are you having a difficult time with whole class participation? Are you tired of the old pen and paper assessments?  Discover the exciting PearDeck app that will engage all students while providing immediate effective feedback during formative assessments! 

Our presentation will focus on providing ways to support students with immediate feedback through online formative assessments. We will look at the apps Kahoot and PearDeck to show how teachers and students can engage in an active cycle of learning, assessment, and feedback. Attendees will have opportunities to interact with the Kahoot and PearDeck apps and examine the benefits for students and teachers in using these technology resources. We will also provide support for attendees as they create a PearDeck presentation that can be used in their classroom as well as shared among the participants. We will also foster discussions between the attendees to allow sharing of ideas for student achievement using various technology tools within their professional network.

Moderators
DB

Denyce Butler

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Christine Lam

Christine Lam

Faculty, N/A
VM

Vivian Mun

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Burgundy

10:40am

"Researching the use and impact of mobile technologies in school settings"


[Please note: this session will use an interactive presentation software called Zeetings to engage participants. This is a free web based resource and you should click on the following link to access it before the start of the session: www.zeetings.com/kevinburden]


This session will showcase a set of free resources to support teachers and school leaders who are using mobile technologies in their classrooms and who wish to evaluate and research the impact of these technologies on teaching and learning. The session will overview how these resources can be used in schools and will provide participants with the opportunity to take part in an international network of schools who are researching and evaluating their practices in mobile learning. 

The resources include an interactive Multi-Touch book called ‘Researching and Evaluating iPad in Learning’  and a new iTunes U course with the same title:

These resources can be downloaded from the following URLs:(please try to download these resources before the start of the session)

These resource are underpinned by the iPAC mobile learning framework (Kearney, Schuck, Burden and Aubusson, 2012) which enables school leaders and teachers to evaluate and research their practice in using mobile technologies like the iPad against a clear set of pedagogical criteria. Further details about the iPAC framework can be found here: www.mobilelearningtoolkit.com


Despite the exponential growth of tablet computers and other mobile devices in schools and colleges, there is a genuine concern amongst both policy makers and school level decision-makers, related to the paucity of ‘evidence’ upon which such investments are based. There is also a growing concern in the academic community about how mobile technologies are actually used in schools and to what extent they are significantly transformational, as is often claimed (e.g. Kearney, Burden and Rai, 2015).  Although schools and colleges have invested significantly in these technologies over the past five years, there is still limited evidence to indicate what impact they are having on learning in schools. Encouraging school leaders to undertake their own research and evaluation, sometimes with the assistance of external agencies, is therefore critical to the success of the mobile learning experiment and this presentation will explain how this can be achieved.

The presentation will guide participants through the various stages they need to undertake in order to make rigorous and credible claims about the impact of mobile technologies in learning.  Each of these stages is highlighted and illustrated in the course with a series of case studies based on actual scenarios or research papers. The presentation will highlight each of the following research stages with specific reference to video case studies and empirical data collected by the authors. These stages include:

  • Identifying a suitable pedagogical focus for a research study into the use of mobile technologies in a school
  • Selecting and refining a research question
  • Collecting and analysing data
  • Making claims and recommendations
  • Disseminating and sharing your claims with others

It is anticipated the presentation will encourage school leaders and teachers to pilot the resources that are demonstrated and to participate in an international network of schools and school leaders engaged in this activity. Details about how to get involved will be provided as part of the presentation

References: 

Kearney, M., Schuck, S., Burden, K., & Aubusson, P.(2012) Viewing Mobile Learning from a Pedagogical Perspective. Research in Learning Technology. Vol 20 

 Kearney, M., Burden, K., & Rai, T (2015). Investigating teachers’ adoption of signature pedagogies. Computers & Education, 80, 48-57

Interactive resources

Researching and Evaluating iPad in Learning (iBook) (Burden and Jones, 2016) https://itunes.apple.com/gb/book/research-evaluating-ipad-in/id1162673219?mt=13
Researching and Evaluating iPad in Learning iTunes U Course  (Burden and Jones, 2016) https://itunes.apple.com/gb/course/id1157447590 


Moderators
avatar for Karen Beasley

Karen Beasley

College/University, California State University Fresno

Speakers
avatar for Kevin Burden

Kevin Burden

Professor of Educational Technology, University of Hull
I am currently leading several international projects exploring the use of mobile technologies in teaching and learning, with particular emphasis on teacher education. These include the Mobilising and Transforming Teacher Education Pedagogies project (www.mttep.eu).


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Moselle

10:40am

"Technology: The Frontlines of 21st Century Skills"

Located at the edge of lettuce fields in Salinas, California, Monte Bella Elementary School (formerly Tiburcio Vásquez Elementary School) in the Alisal Union School District is committed to providing their students with a 21st century education. Monte Bella is a Title I, kindergarten through 6th grade school with 87% of students that are socioeconomically disadvantaged and 70% English learners (Núñez, 2016). A 1:1 iPad school, Monte Bella takes technology integration to the next level. Their students take their devices home every day. Taking iPads home provides students with access to content area instruction, books, and applications regardless of home internet access. By giving students access to devices at home, 21st century education becomes focused on becoming a global digital citizen and lifelong learner. As Monte Bella integrates technology with 21st century skills into classroom pedagogy and content, faculty use the SAMR model (Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, and Redefinition) in conjunction with the P21’s 21st Century Learning Framework to drive instructional decision-making (Puentedura, 2014; P21, 2013). In 2016, Monte Bella was recognized as an outstanding school by the California Department of Education’s Gold Ribbon committee for their integration of 21st century skills and technology (Cheng, 2016).

Over the last four years, the faculty have been moving beyond substitution and augmentation into modification and redefinition of instruction, homework and assessment. Students and faculty teach communication and collaboration skills through digital storytelling using a variety of mediums, such as live and voice-over video, stop motion animation, and green screens. Not limited to language arts but also used in math, digital storytelling students use critical thinking and creativity to explain math concepts. Over the last two years, coding has been introduced to the upper grades, not just as a math or STEM concept but also as an animation and storytelling tool. Coding helps English learns with sequential and critical thinking. Learning continues at home for Monte Bella students. Faculty use workflow apps like Google Classroom and Seesaw to engage learners when they are not at school. Students missing school know to check their workflow apps for assignments and instructional videos. Learners can engage with the online content, asking questions, responding academically to their peers and collaborating on projects. Student homework has been redefined as students create videos explaining their thinking, take photos of math problems in real life, and write classroom blog posts. Technology- based assessments provide formative feedback, allowing faculty to adjust instruction while teaching, providing effective differentiation for their students. By leveraging a variety of innovative technology assessment tools, students are engaged and faculty have multiple measures of achievement. Using assessment data, the faculty reflects on their teaching and integration of technology.

Consequently combined with reflective pedagogy and ongoing formative assessment, the faculty is using technology to develop and refine student skills. Students are excited to come to school. With a student waiting list, the school culture of 21st century skills paired with technology has made Monte Bella a school of choice in Salinas.

References

Cheng, C. (2016, April 13). 2016 California gold ribbon schools - year 2016 [Press release]. Retrieved from http://www.cde.ca.gov/nr/ne/yr16/yr16rel27.asp.

Núñez, R. (2016, January 29). Tiburcio vasquez elementary school 2014-2015 school accountability report card [report]. Retrieved from http://www.alisal.org/research/documents/2015_School_Accountability_Report_Card_Tiburcio_ V asquez_Elementary_20160129.pdf.

Framework for 21st century learning - P21 [Position paper] (2013, January). Retrieved from http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/docs/P21_framework_0816.pdf

Puentedura, R. (2014, June 29). Learning, technology, and the SAMR model: goals, processes, and practice [Presentation]. Retrieved from http://www.hippasus.com/rrpweblog/archives/2014/06/29/LearningTechnologySAMRModel.pdf 


Moderators
avatar for Alice Flores

Alice Flores

Director Grants and Initiatives, CalStateTEACH
Implemented/required iPads for all teacher candidates in fall 2010 to develop technology literate teachers. Supported the video mentor project, touch books, animation, engineering and coding as 21st century skills for teacher candidates.

Speakers
avatar for Lora Carey

Lora Carey

5th Grade Teacher, Alisal Union School District


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Bordeaux

10:40am

"Using iTunesU Courses in ITE for self-reflection, self-assessment and peer-to-peer feedback"

Teacher Education programmes are called upon to prepare students to be reflective practitioners, and also to provide opportunites for students to reflect critically on their practice and to receive and respond to feedback on their practice. (Teaching Council of Ireland, 2011).

Reflection can prove challenging, however, and even problematic, particularly for novice, pre-service teachers (Calderhead, 1989; Hatton & Smith, 1995; Korthagen, 2001; Moon, 1999). Technology can afford possibilities to render reflection more engaging and interactive (Barrett, 2005). 

In this interactive practitioner session I propose to show how mobile technology affords rich opportunity for self-reflection, self-assessment, and peer-to-peer feedback. Initial Teacher Education students on the MGO Programme (Máistir Gairmiúil san Oideachas) reflect on their own practice by using the built-in features on iTunesU Courses. Using notes, posts, discussions, and links, this session will be hands-on and interactive, and I will step through the whole process, using examples and videos.

This is proposed as a practical session, demonstrating the flexibility of iTunesU Courses for both ITE student and faculty. Videos of practice are collated in one place, and a visual journal of developing practice is gathered throughout the two year programme. Teacher portfolios are built up in an iTunesU course during the ITE programme and provide both a record and a learning tool for use in the further development of the teacher as their career progresses. 

References

Barrett, H. (2005). White paper: Researching electronic portfolios and learner engagement. Retrieved on 12/4/10 from http://electronicportfolios.org/reflect/whitepaper.pdf 

Calderhead, J. (1989). Reflective teaching and teacher education. Teaching and Teacher Education, 5(1), 43-51. Retrieved on 28/3/13 from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0742051X8990018 8. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0742-051X(89)90018-8 

Hatton, N., & Smith, D. (1995). Reflection in teacher education: Towards definition and implementation. Teaching and Teacher Education, 11(1), 33-49. Retrieved on 20/8/10 from http://www.sciencedirect.com/ 

Korthagen, F. (2001a). Helping individual student teachers become reflective: The supervisory process. In F. Korthagen (Ed.), Linking Practice and Theory: The Pedagogy of Realistic Teacher Education (pp. 108-130). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates, Inc. 

Moon, J. (1999). Reflection in learning and professional development. London: Kogan Page. 

Teaching Council (2011). Initial Teacher Education: Criteria and Guidelines for Programme Providers: Dublin 


Moderators
LA

Loretta Aragon

Faculty, CSU, Fresno

Speakers
avatar for Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Sinéad Ní Ghuidhir

Program director, NUI Galway
I am interested in all of the following! Assessment, reflection, using mobile technology for assessment and peer feedback. Initial teacher education. Language learning, active learning. Using the ipad on the go - for organisation, for taking notes, for sketchnoting, to connect with... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 10:40am - 11:00am
Colombard

11:00am

AM Break
Break

Saturday January 14, 2017 11:00am - 11:15am
Continental Ballroom

11:15am

"Creating a Virtual Community of Practice in Teacher Education"

Teacher preparation programs develop pre-service teacher identities as practitioners, shifting students roles from candidates and into teachers, while guiding them through theory, practice, their academic studies, clinical experiences, and/or school sites (Darling-Hammond, L., 2006; Feiman-Nemser, 2001; Hughes, 2006). Pre-service teachers are often assigned higher education faculty and experienced mentor teachers to guide their development in a supportive community. These informal support groups could be developed into a community of practice, or a social learning system grounded in sociocultural theories of learning and development (Wenger, 2000). Community of practice (Lave & Wenger, 1991) models with pre-service teachers provide known benefits for success in the teaching profession which include increased professional reflection, self-efficacy, and confidence in the classroom. Other benefits include development of collegial relationships with other educators, which allow novices to learn from experts in the community of practice (Feiman-Nemser, 2001; Grossman, Wineburg, & Woolworth, 2001; Jimenez-Silva & Olson, 2012; Lave & Wenger, 1991; Perry, Walton, & Calder, 1999).

In the CalStateTEACH online and site-supported teacher preparation program, candidates are placed with volunteer mentor teachers in elementary school sites to observe, participate and begin student teaching (CalStateTEACH, 1999). To promote further support and collaboration, CalStateTEACH will consider developing a virtual community of practice that includes interactive forums and compiled podcasts, creating opportunities for candidates, mentor teachers and faculty to connect across geographic boundaries. This session explores how this community can facilitate sharing ideas, questions, lessons and links through the digital curation of tools, including applications, websites, other resources and curriculum while providing an open forum for questions and interaction about the teaching practice. Furthermore, this session discusses how faculty and mentor teachers can attend as guest speakers, providing expertise on specific topics or they can help to facilitate the discussion by directing candidates with prompts and addressing their individual questions. Finally, this session aims to explore the progression of establishing strategies for implementation of the virtual community of practice in a teacher preparation program.

KEYWORDS

pre-service teachers, teacher preparation, virtual community of practice, geographic boundaries, digital curation

References

CalStateTEACH--CSU Teacher Preparation Program. (1999). Retrieved October 1, 2016, from http://www.calstateteach.net/

Cohen, D.S. (2005). The heart of change field guide: tools and tactics for leading change in Your Organization. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press. Kindle Edition.

Dodson, S. (2010). Teachers use 'speed dating' technique to swap ideas at Bett 2010. Retrieved July 6, 2016, from https://www.theguardian.com/resource/two-minutes 

Feiman-Nemser, S. (2001). From preparation to practice: Designing a continuum to strengthen and sustain teaching. Teachers College Record, 103(6), 1013-1055.

Grossman, P., Wineburg, S., & Woolworth, S. (2001). Toward a theory of teacher community. Teachers College Record, 103(6), 924-1012.

Heath, C., & Heath, D. (2010). Switch: How to change things when change is hard. New York, NY: Broadway Books.

Heifetz, R. A., Linsky, M.; Grashow, A. (2009). The practice of adaptive leadership: tools and tactics for changing your organization and the world. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Review Press. Kindle Edition.

Jimenez-Silva, M. & Olson, K. (2012) A community of practice in teacher education: Insights and Perceptions. International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, 24(3), 335-348.

Kotter, J. P. (2010). Leading change: Why transformation efforts fail. Boston, MA: Harvard Business Press. Kindle Edition.

Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Northouse, Peter G. (2015). Leadership: theory and practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition. 

O' Gallagher, C. (2009). Scottish learning festival and teachMeet. Retrieved July 6, 2016 from http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/scotlandlearning/2009/09/scottish-learning-festival-and.shtml

Perry, N., Walton, C., & Calder, K. (1999). Teachers developing assessments of early literacy: A community of practice project. Teacher Education and Special Education, 22(4), 218-233.

Rogers, E. M. (2003). Diffusion of innovations. New York: Free Press.

Senge, P., Hamilton, H. & John, K. (2015). The dawn of system leadership. Stanford Social Innovation Review. Winter 2015. 27-33.

 Wenger, E. (2000). Communities of practice and social learning systems. Organization, 7(2), 225-246.


Moderators
avatar for Pam Neyman

Pam Neyman

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Cassandra Kelley

Cassandra Kelley

Faculty, CalStateTEACH Teacher Preparation Program & National University
Educational Technology; Teacher Preparation; Professional Development | | Cassandra has 7 years of classroom teaching experience. She was also the School Technology Coordinator for six years, facilitating professional development in technology implementation and additionally taught... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Burgundy

11:15am

"Engaging Preservice teachers in an integrative unit project that showcases technology competencies."

This presentation will be discussing the evolution of preservice teacher final projects in a technology integration course which occurred within a program that has a one to one iPad initiative. Students in this course create an integrated unit that requires them to create a multi­touch book, an iTunesU course, and multiple lesson plans that integrate audio, video, and reviewed app. Students are required to create examples of all the technology.

In addition to showing student projects, we will discuss how the project has evolved during the evolution of A one to one iPad program . This project is a very loosely structured curriculum project that allows for the integration of technology based on the technology available and engaged these future teachers in making instructional choices. We also will discuss ways that we work to overcome common barriers in Preservice teacher education like checklist mentality, lack of creativity, and aversion to risk taking. In technical areas we will discuss student reluctance to use audio in meaningful ways and issues with uploading, sharing and ensuring appropriate creative common use.

The overall structure of the course will be discussed including 2/3 of the time being spent on exploring technologies, apps, and accessories and making decisions about each of them. The final third of the course requires students to act collaboratively and demonstrate the ISTE Standards for Teachers in both their behavior and products to demonstrate their technology proficiencies. 

Materials available via ITunes U

Preservice Teachers Technology Projects

https://itunesu.itunes.apple.com/enroll/DSP-XLE-HZE


Moderators
KS

Kelly Sakugawa

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Theresa Cullen

Dr. Theresa Cullen

Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma
Theresa A. Cullen is an Associate Professor in Instructional Psychology and Technology at the University of Oklahoma where she coordinates the undergraduate technology integration courses and the 1 to 1 iPad program for all undergraduate teacher education students. She was named an... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Bordeaux

11:15am

"Optimizing MERLOT to Optimize ICT Literacy in Curricula"

MERLOT stands for Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching. Established by the California State University system, MERLOT is a community-curated repository of over 60,000 learning objects, many of which are mobile-enabled.  These learning objects consist of case studies, simulations, drill and practice, presentations, animations, articles and texts, reference materials, technology tools, assignments, and assessments. MERLOT has several ways to locate relevant and developmentally appropriate learning objects, and users can browse the bookmark collection and learning activities.

Educators, and post-secondary students can join MERLOT for free.  MERLOT members can create, copy and modify bookmark collections for their own use as well as serving as a centralized URL for students to access. Members can also create learning exercises and courses that incorporate learning objects. They can also review new contributions, and join the site’s virtual speakers’ bureau.

MERLOT offers several ways to build a sense of community. The website includes subject-specific community portals, academic support services, and partner communities (several of which are outside the U.S.). MERLOT also supports “Voices,” an online discussion board venue where members can and create and participate in online conversations. MERLOT produces a newsletter and blog for current information, and partners with Sloan for an annual conference.

The ICT Literacy community portal (http://teachingcommons.cdl.edu/ictliteracy/index.html) provides an overview of MERLOT and how to find ICT literacy learning objects, ICT literacy standards, and guidelines for ICT literacy enhanced assignments. The portal links to a four-part workshop on integrating ICT literacy into the curriculum which can be done as a self-paced tutorial, and used as a framework for conducting workshops for the education community.

In short, the session shows librarians how to take advantage of MERLOT to develop creative and engaging learning activities that integrate ICT literacy.


Moderators
avatar for Peter Krasa

Peter Krasa

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Lesley Farmer

Lesley Farmer

Professor and Program Coordinator, CSULB
Dr. Lesley Farmer coordinates the librarianship program at CSULB, and manages the CSU ICT Literacy project. Her research interests are digital citizenship, literacies, assessment, and collaboration. See her websites http://cyberfamilies.blogspot.com and tinyurl.com/FakeNewsLibGuide... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Colombard

11:15am

"Using a Virtual Classroom to Fill the Gaps in Teacher Education"

Despite recent calls for improvement of teacher training, the field of teacher education struggles with several areas in which it is difficult to build consistency (Darling-Hammond, 2010). One prime example is student teaching: student teaching placements tend to be very different from one another, and naturally the students within the student teaching classrooms also have great variability from class to class and year to year. Ensuring a minimum degree of consistency in the student teaching experience is a daunting task, yet one that the field is challenged to tackle.  Additionally, most teacher education programs do not have the resources to embed their teachers in authentic classroom placements throughout their entire program. As a result, teacher candidates tend to take their coursework first, participating in prolonged clinical practice only during student teaching, at the end of their program (Darling-Hammond, 2006).

Another difficulty in the field is providing timely feedback to student teachers as they practice their skills. When candidates begin their student teaching experience they are put in front of a classroom to teach, and even if a lesson goes badly, the student teacher has to struggle through to the conclusion, to the detriment of both the candidate and the children. There are few if any opportunities to catch problems as they occur, to discuss options for correcting problems, or to try things again for improvement.

This presentation will show how one teacher education program is using a mixed-reality simulation lab to provide their new teachers with hands-on teaching practice and immediate feedback, as a supplement to their coursework and student teaching. Unlike teaching in a real classroom, in a virtual classroom environment teacher candidates can stop and ask questions, brainstorm alternatives, and start their lessons over to improve them on the spot. The mixed-reality classroom, which combines real and virtual worlds, allows teachers to interact with virtual students in real time, and gives opportunities for practice and reflection that may not be available in real classrooms (Dieker, Rodriguez, Lignugaris/Kraft, Hynes, & Hughes, 2014). 

In fact, practice in the mixed-reality classroom has been shown to increase new teachers’ ability to ask higher-level questions and give specific feedback to students,  (Straub, Dieker, Hines, & Hughes, 2014), among other valuable skills. Additionally, these skills have been demonstrated to generalize to real classrooms. The growing body of research on the use of mixed-reality virtual classrooms as a tool to give new teachers practice and feedback shows real promise for improving a broad collection of critical teacher skills.

This presentation is ideal for school administrators, teacher educators, or anyone interested in improving the training of teachers. Attendees of this presentation will leave with a strong understanding of how a virtual simulation system can build teacher competencies in teaching and interpersonal communication, and how it could be used to improve a teacher education program, or to provide support for struggling new teachers.

References

Darling-Hammond, L. (2006). Powerful teacher education: Lessons from exemplary programs. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

Darling-Hammond, L. (2010). Recognizing and developing effective teaching: What policy makers should know and do. Policy Brief, National Education Association.

Dieker, L.A., Rodriguez, J., Lignugaris/Kraft, B., Hynes, M., & Hughes, C. (2014). The future of simulated environments in teacher education: Current potential and future possibilities. Teacher Education and Special Education, 37(1), 21-33. 

Straub, C., Dieker, L., Hines, M., & Hughes, C. (2014). Using virtual rehearsal in TLE TeachLive mixed reality classroom simulator to determine the effects on mathematics teachers.  Technical report, TeachLive National Research Project.


Moderators
JB

Jane Bomba

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers

Saturday January 14, 2017 11:15am - 11:35am
Moselle

11:40am

"Advancing the Next Generation of School Site Mentors with Virtual Teacher Learning Communities"

CalStateTEACH, a California State University Teacher Preparation Program, is piloting two-hour, school site mentor training sessions using Zoom, an online video

conferencing tool. To meet an increasing need for highly effective mentors, the training sessions are designed as scalable for statewide implementation. A feature of the CalStateTEACH Program is sustained and intensive mentoring/coaching by experienced teachers during the teacher candidates’ Clinical Practice. The mentor facilitates learning-focused conversations that compel teacher candidates to evaluate their practice, try out new strategies, and reflect on and document their new learning as evidence of development and growth over time. For the preparation program to cultivate highly effective mentors, the virtual training sessions transform a well-researched face- to-face format for Teacher Learning Communities into an online format. The program has two overarching goals for the online mentor training sessions: (1) development of virtual Learning Communities for veteran teachers and (2) multiple opportunities for the mentor teachers to strengthen and expand their coaching capacities while learning and practicing in a virtual environment. To accomplish this task, the mentor training sessions unify current research on how mentor teachers learn best and how to strategically support teacher candidates’ instructional effectiveness. In this interactive session, participants will join Zoom Video Breakout Rooms to experience a Virtual Learning Community designed to put new knowledge to work and provide practice for skill retention. Participants will experience insights into how training content and processes are thoughtfully chosen to support mentor learning and skills. Additionally, participants will receive access to research materials and agenda templates to transform their own mentor training into successful Virtual Teacher Learning Communities.

References 

Lipton, L. & Wellman, B. (2012). The Road to Learning. Sherman, CT: MiraVia LLC. Novak, K. & Thibodeau, T. (2016). UDL in the Cloud! How to Design and Deliver Online

Education Using Universal Design for Learning. CAST Professional Publishing.

Thompson, M. & Goe, L. (2009). Models for Scalable Teacher Professional Development. Princeton, New Jersey: Educational Testing Service.


Moderators
GR

Georgi Ravenna

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
RC

Rebecca Chirchick

Faculty, N/A
P

Paula

Faculty, N/A
avatar for Taquan Stewart

Taquan Stewart

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:40am - 12:00pm
Burgundy

11:40am

"Bringing NASA Technology Down to Earth!"

There’s More SPACE In Your Life Than You Think!

When NASA sets out on a new mission to explore the cosmos, we know the results will often surprise and astonish us.  NASA makes sure these innovations go beyond their original uses to benefit the public as widely as possible.  These secondary applications can be surprising as the scientific discoveries made by our spacecraft. Today we will take a look at some 2017 NASA Spinoffs and how to relate the Spinoffs to your classroom.

Did you know there's NASA technology protecting buildings against earthquakes, making your car safer, and in tools used by archeologists to uncover the landscape?  Every year Spinoffs shows how NASA is bringing space technology down to Earth where it benefits the public and improves your life. 

 Some examples:

1) Brand new unique damper technology that stops shaking in it tracks.  NASA used it to protect rockets but the device now protects skyscrapers from wind and earthquakes. 

Earth vs. Mars: What similar physical processes occur on both Earth and Mars? In this activity, students work in pairs to compare and contrast the physical processes that may be inferred through the observation of images of both Mars and Earth. They will discuss the processes that have occurred on the Earth and the outcomes that have resulted, and transfer this knowledge to the interpretation of the processes that may have occurred on Mars.


Keywords: physical processes, geography, planet origins, erosion, landforms, earthquakes, volcanoes, atmosphere, fluvial, canyons, channels, craters, uplilfting, downcutting

Student activities: 

1- Build a Shake Table
2- Earthquake Tower Challenge
3- Leaning Tower of Pasta
4-  Strong as the Weakest Link

 2) NASA technology is improving car safety.  A high-speed camera made to record the Orion capsule's parachute deployment now films car crash tests.  Data from these tests helps you and your children through improved car designs.

Student Activities:

Parachute Design Engineer Challenge  When NASA lands a spacecraft on another planet or object in our solar system, it is important to have a soft landing so the spacecraft is not damaged on impact. When humans are on board, it's even more important to have a soft landing. The larger and more massive the spacecraft, the more difficult it is to achieve a soft landing. 

1-In an effort to land larger and more massive objects on Mars, NASA has tested a variety of parachutes as part of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator project, or LDSD. LDSD uses a large parachute–the largest ever used–to help slow the landing vehicle. 

2-Lunar Rover Challenge - Using different designs and wheels for a safe landing.

3) Laser Imager used for archeology is state of the art.  NASA original used the technology to discover SNOW on Mars.  Back on Earth it's identifying important new excavations from lost cities in the rainforest to prehistoric hunting grounds on the American plains.

Student Activities:

1-Planting an Ecosystem on Mars

Taming the brutal environment of Mars for future human explorers to survive and thrive there may demand a touch of “ecopoiesis” – the creation of an ecosystem able to support life. Students will design a ecosystem using laser imager

2-Space archaeologists don’t actually work in space. Instead, they use satellite imagery, taken by spacecraft whizzing 400 miles above Earth’s surface, to find things buried within the planet’s crust.   Students will participate in a archaeologists dig using instruments that they will make simpler to the ones space archaeologists use.

Moderators
TM

Tim McConnico

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Otto Benavides

Otto Benavides

Emeritus Professor, Fresno State
Super friendly and great guy!
avatar for Karen Roark

Karen Roark

EPD Specialist, NASA Ames Research Center/Texas State


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:40am - 12:00pm
Bordeaux

11:40am

"The use of mobile technology to promote and develop pupils' independent thinking and learning"

In order to investigate the use of mobile technology in education, The Girls’ Day School Trust (network of 26 schools in the United Kingdom) trialed the use the iPads in their school. Putney High School decided to run a 1- to-1 trial in Y4 of the Junior School to see if they helped promote independent thinking and learning. Throughout the year, the teachers planned an integration of iPads into their curriculum based on almost a year of research previously undertaken. The results suggest that the use of iPads has promoted independent thinking and learning skills such as resilience, risk, collaboration and creativity and that using 1-to-1 mobile devices is realistic and achievable. This presentation will explore how mobile technology developed our pupils’ independent thinking and learning, how it was used to support the teachers, the children and the curriculum throughout the course of a year’s trial and how the school has progressed into a 1-to-1 school based on the outcome of the successful trial. 


Moderators
avatar for Allen Sussman

Allen Sussman

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Andy Perryer

Andy Perryer

Head of Digital Learning, Putney High School


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:40am - 12:00pm
Colombard

11:40am

“Using Videopapers in Teacher Training Education"

This session presents the opinions of two groups of student teachers on their experience of using videopapers in teacher training education. Videopapers are multimedia documents that integrate and synchronise video, images and text in one non-linear, cohesive document (Nemirovsky et al 2005). Videopapers were introduced into the students’ education based on the belief that they can support the student teachers’ reflective processes. Opinions from student teachers were gathered from comments made in the videopapers themselves as well as in an online questionnaire that the students filled in after they had written, presented and discussed their videopaper. The students’ reaction to using the videopaper as a method of reflection was overwhelmingly positive. All of the students felt that working with videopapers had led to increased reflection on their professional practice. These findings reflect previous findings made by Almås and Krumsvik (2008) and Smith and Krumsvik (2007) amongst others. The paper concludes that the use of videopapers can create a means of bridging the gap between theory and practice. They can enable student teachers to reflect more deeply and overtly on their practice and articulate tacit knowledge which otherwise can be difficult to articulate.


Moderators
avatar for Karen DeVoogd

Karen DeVoogd

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Tobias Ruhtenberg

Tobias Ruhtenberg

Lecturer, University of Boras
Educational technology, Teacher education. Mobile technology in teacher education. Web based learning.


Saturday January 14, 2017 11:40am - 12:00pm
Moselle

12:00pm

Lunch & Sharing Ideas to Promote Mobile Technology in Teacher Education!
Limited Capacity seats available

Saturday Lunch & Discuss the MiTE 2018 Conference possibilities

Moderators
avatar for Alice Flores

Alice Flores

Director Grants and Initiatives, CalStateTEACH
Implemented/required iPads for all teacher candidates in fall 2010 to develop technology literate teachers. Supported the video mentor project, touch books, animation, engineering and coding as 21st century skills for teacher candidates.
avatar for Seán Ó Grádaigh

Seán Ó Grádaigh

Lecturer, NUI Galway, School of Education
With a background in second-level teaching and educational technologies, Seán is currently employed as a Lecturer in Education in the School of Education, NUI Galway. Seán developed and coordinated the first fully integrated 1:1 mobile device deployment on an Initial Teacher Education... Read More →
avatar for John Ittelson

John Ittelson

Professor Emeritus,, CSU Monterey Bay / CalStateTEACH
John is a Professor Emeritus of Information Technology and Communications Design at CSUMB. He earned his Ph.D. in 1978 from Northwestern University in Educational Psychology/Instructional Design. John also servers as CalStateTEACH Faculty Technology Advisor and is an  Apple Distinguished... Read More →

Saturday January 14, 2017 12:00pm - 12:45pm
Continental Ballroom

1:00pm

"Authoring a Multi-touch Digital Textbook in a Teacher Education Course: Empirical Research and Practical Applications"
The purpose of this presentation is to share the benefits and challenges of multi-touch textbook authorship. Specifically, participants will learn about the impact of customized, open-access texts on students in a graduate teacher education course. Because of the rapid evolution of e-reading capabilities through recent advances in tablet computing, no empirical studies existed prior to 2016 to describe the impact of multi-touch interactive eTexts, which are only accessible on these latest tablet computers. This session is intended to share research results and the practical implications of the successful integration of a customized, open-access textbook in a graduate education course.

Moderators
avatar for Randall Plaugher

Randall Plaugher

Faculty, California State University Fresno

Speakers
avatar for Michael Mills

Michael Mills

Associate Professor, University of Central Arkansas
Dr. Michael Mills, Assistant Professor of Teaching and Learning at the University of Central Arkansas, is a leading expert on the practical uses of educational technology, particularly on using collaborative tools to better engage students and to design strategies for effectively... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
Colombard

1:00pm

"Creating Digital Content for Teacher Education Coursework"

In April 2015 – a group of teacher educators convened in Cupertino for a three-day summit with two particular goals – share how iPads were being used in teacher education programs, and create shared materials in the form of multi-touch books and iTunesU courses that could be easily incorporated into other teacher education programs. Each of the attendees had a specific content area expertise and the activities and workshops were designed to inspire creativity and collaborative sharing while leveraging the power of mobile technologies.  Teacher educators were present from a variety of public and private colleges and universities from all over the world, and represented a variety disciplines.

This panel presentation will feature teacher educators who created projects as part of the summit.  We will discuss how we are using iPads and content creation at our sites and share the artifacts of our work as part of the summit and beyond. We will discuss how we created the materials to both share the content with attendees and inspire and encourage attendees to create similar shareable content.   We plan to talk about the kind of culture and leadership challenges that have come into play with using these materials in our teaching and provide attendees with guidance for navigating toward creating similar products at their own institutions. 

The course materials that were created and will be represented by panelists include:

  • Preparing for Your First Teaching Job
  • Reading instruction for students with disabilities
  • Content Area eReading
  • Reading Elementary K-6 (8 week)
  • Links to other course materials created by those not represented 
All of our content is available via iTunes U 

https://itunesu.itunes.apple.com/enroll/DXD-JXD-JTA 


Moderators
avatar for James Rogers

James Rogers

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Theresa Cullen

Dr. Theresa Cullen

Associate Professor, University of Oklahoma
Theresa A. Cullen is an Associate Professor in Instructional Psychology and Technology at the University of Oklahoma where she coordinates the undergraduate technology integration courses and the 1 to 1 iPad program for all undergraduate teacher education students. She was named an... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
Burgundy

1:00pm

"Making it massive: developing a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) for teacher CPD"

This presentation shares the motivation and experiences of the Girls’ Day School Trust (GDST) in developing and running Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for continued professional development for teachers across the globe with FutureLearn, the UK’s biggest and most prestigious MOOC providers, who work with 80+ top international universities and specialist education institutions. 

The perceived benefits of this approach to delivering teacher CPD included the following: 

• A large number of our teachers had already participated in MOOCs of their own volition and had found it a valuable way of engaging in tailored, on-demand CPD. 

• Delivering CPD on an open platform gave us the opportunity to share our training courses with the wider education community across the globe, including in developing countries. 

• Engaging a wide audience of teachers would allow our teachers to benefit from working with a wider learning community, gaining a huge amount for the experiences of teachers in varied contexts and countries. 

• Delivering CPD in an online form would give our teachers a chance to experience, as learners, online learning models, thus informing their own practice in designing and delivering online learning. 

• MOOCs remain predominantly a Higher Education-led phenomena, and as such, working in this field gives us the opportunity to engage and interact with Higher Education institutions, sharpening our focus on research-informed practice. 

• The experience of developing and facilitating a MOOC would be a valuable learning experience in itself for our lead educators, and would lead to the development of a huge range of learning materials that could be used effectively in other contexts. 

• As an innovative organisation, we were keen to explore and evaluate the potential of new models of teacher CPD and engage in opportunities for research in this area. 

This presentation includes detailed explanation of our motivations, reflections on the experience of developing a MOOC, and evaluation of the effectiveness of the first course run.


Moderators
JP

Joye Plaugher

Faculty, California State University Fresno

Speakers
avatar for Catherine Scutt

Catherine Scutt

Head of Learning Technology and Innovation, Girls' Day School Trust
Passionate about teaching and learning, research, CPD, creating communities, and effective use of digital technology.


Saturday January 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:20pm
Bordeaux

1:00pm

"Why Code?"
Engage in a discussion answering the question as to: Why should students learn to code in School. This session will be a condensed in depth discussion on establishing a "Culture of Purpose " concerning the implementation of Computer Science foundations and development of Coding skills across the STEM curriculum.  Participants should walk away with a clear vision as how to guide their classroom and school into the world of Coding and Computer Science.

Moderators
SG

Sonia Gonzalez

Faculty, CalStateTEACH

Speakers
BV

Brian Van Dyck

Faculty, CalStateTEACH


Saturday January 14, 2017 1:00pm - 1:30pm
Moselle

1:20pm

PM Break
Saturday January 14, 2017 1:20pm - 1:35pm
Continental Ballroom

1:35pm

Conference Closing Remarks
Saturday January 14, 2017 1:35pm - 1:45pm
Continental Ballroom

1:45pm

Danny Brassell, Ph.D Closing Keynote
Limited Capacity seats available

Closing Session
Danny Brassell, Ph.D
Danny inspires audiences around the world to achieve greater performance, engagement and happiness by discovering their personal motivation. Infusing humor, inspiration and simple techniques to initiate positive change – both at home and in the workplace – Danny has been dubbed “Jim Carrey with a Ph.D.” for his high-energy, world-class keynotes
 

Speakers
avatar for Danny Brassell

Danny Brassell

Faculty, CalStateTEACH
Danny Brassell, Ph.D | Danny inspires audiences around the world to achieve greater performance, engagement and happiness by discovering their personal motivation. Infusing humor, inspiration and simple techniques to initiate positive change – both at home and in the workplace... Read More →


Saturday January 14, 2017 1:45pm - 2:30pm
Continental Ballroom